sunspot


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Related to sunspot: Sunspot cycle

sun·spot

 (sŭn′spŏt′)
n.
Any of the relatively cool dark spots appearing periodically in groups on the surface of the sun that are associated with strong magnetic fields.

sunspot

(ˈsʌnˌspɒt)
n
1. (Astronomy) any of the dark cool patches, with a diameter of up to several thousand kilometres, that appear on the surface of the sun and last about a week. They occur in approximately 11-year cycles and possess a strong magnetic field
2. informal a sunny holiday resort
3. (Pathology) Austral a small cancerous spot produced by overexposure to the sun
ˈsunˌspotted adj

sun•spot

(ˈsʌnˌspɒt)

n.
one of the relatively dark patches that appear periodically on the surface of the sun and affect terrestrial magnetism and certain other terrestrial phenomena.
[1805–15]

sun·spot

(sŭn′spŏt′)
Any of the relatively cool dark spots that appear in groups on the surface of the sun. Sunspots are associated with strong magnetic fields.

sunspot


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One of many relatively cool dark spots that appear periodically on the surface of the Sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sunspot - a cooler darker spot appearing periodically on the sun's photospheresunspot - a cooler darker spot appearing periodically on the sun's photosphere; associated with a strong magnetic field
maculation, patch, speckle, dapple, fleck, spot - a small contrasting part of something; "a bald spot"; "a leopard's spots"; "a patch of clouds"; "patches of thin ice"; "a fleck of red"
Translations

sunspot

[ˈsʌnspɒt] N
1. (= resort) centro turístico muy soleado
2. (Astron) → mancha f solar

sunspot

[ˈsʌnspɒt] n (on the sun's surface)tache f solaire

sunspot

[ˈsʌnˌspɒt] n (Astron) → macchia solare

sunspot

n. mancha de sol.
References in classic literature ?
Come, cheer up, old man; there's no use in losing your grip and going back to this child's play merely because this big sunspot is drifting across your shiny new disk.
A sunspot usually consists of a circular dark core (the umbra) with a vertical magnetic field and radially-elongated fine threads (the penumbra) with a horizontal field.
Finally, this twisted field pokes out through the solar surface, where we see it as a sunspot.
Called AR12665, the sunspot was first seen July 5 as it rotated into view of NASA's Solar Dynamic Observatory, and SDO continued observing it as it passed across the face of our star, finally going out of view July 17.
Mary Jane Knox wondered whether planets, moons and other celestial bodies in the solar system might contribute to the formation of sunspots and other solar activity: "Could they be reflecting the sun's rays back on it causing hot spots which might allow the eruption of the magnetic fields?
Regarding the first measure of solar activity, Johann Rudolf Wolf--a professional Swiss astronomer from the Bern Observatory and later at Zurich--introduced his familiar relative SSN R in 1849, formulating it as R = k (10g + f), where k is a correction factor used to compensate for observing conditions, the size of the telescope, the method of observation, and the individual observer; g is the number of sunspot groups; and/is the number of individual sunspots discernible on the solar disk.
Solar minimum occurred in December 2008 and solar maximum (when the sunspot count is highest) was predicted for May 2013.
The best sunspot remover depends on the patient's skin, the nature of the sunspot and other factors.
Washington, June 3 ( ANI ): Multi-wavelength observations of sunspots with the 1.
AR1817 S20[degrees]/238[degrees] appeared as a small collection of pores trailing sunspot groups AR1814 and AR1816 on Aug 10.
The sunspot is so large it is visible with the naked eye, but astronomers warned against looking directly into the sun.