superachiever

superachiever

(ˌsuːpərəˈtʃiːvə)
n
someone who achieves more than most; high achiever
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, it takes a "different kind of a man to be married to a superachiever. John Shaw is just that different.
Though it may not look like it on the surface, it's not all work for this superachiever. Every member of her family has pointed out how much Vanessa loves to travel.
The authors open almost every chapter with the biography of an African American financial superachiever like Johnnie Cochran Jr.
To conclude, there is absolutely no support for the hypothesis that China is a superachiever as a host of FDI from the world's major source countries.
He showed that although Kafka described himself as a helpless shlemiel on the job, in fact he was a superachiever: He used bureaucratic procedures to transform the Czech system of workmen's compensation into a system of accident prevention; he learned how mines and factories worked from the inside, fought the bosses, forced big changes, helped save thousands of workers' lives; he was probably the inventor of OSHA, and one of the most creative bureaucrats of the century.
If this is true, will increased consumption of gourmet tea indicate that we are slowing down our superachiever "quantity of life" personalities and are taking a slower, "quality of life" viewpoint?
I confess I'm smitten by some of the superachiever poster boys who have marched in full uniform out of their closets and into the courts in recent years--including Joseph Steffan, expelled from the U.S.
The England Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has sent him a bat signed by members of the England and Indian teams of the just-concluded Test series -- including that of two superachievers from the host team -- Alastair Cook and James Anderson.
?|PITMAN Training Liverpool is calling for nominations to enter its online awards, SuperAchievers 2015.
In psychology, therapists use it to name dysfunctional behaviors common to this subset: separation/individuation issues; a need to be superachievers; unstable alternating identification with their parents; impaired self-esteem; problems with aggression; difficulties with intimacy.