superbomb


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superbomb

(ˈsuːpəˌbɒm)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) an extremely powerful bomb, a hydrogen or fusion bomb
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) obsolete a fission bomb
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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America announced it has tested a superbomb in a warning to North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, right, who fired a missile over Japan.
Churchill agreed to those severe the war years about the mutual exchange of secret information on the atomic superbomb. The proud British, figuratively speaking, <<gritting their teeth>> and realizing that by voluntary transfer to the Americans of their data on the new superweapons, they lose the <<key>> to world domination, after all, under pressure from external and internal circumstances, they were forced to give the US their developments of own nuclear weapons.
AMERICA yesterday said it had tested a nuclear superbomb as a show of strength in the face of North Korean warmongering.
Poor Brent could be a Bond baddie unveiling a new superbomb for all we know as all we're thinking about is what's for lunch.
As opposed to the atomic bomb, the kind dropped on Japan in the closing days of the Second World War, the hydrogen bomb, or so-called "superbomb", can be far more powerful - experts say, by 1,000 times or more.
When those soldiers learn that the Fuhrer is planning to build a superbomb, the Americans defy orders to put their lives on the line to halt the devastating weapon.
The collection begins with the memorandum prepared by Rudolf Peierls and Otto Frisch in March 1940 on the 'radioactive "superbomb"' and ends 67 years later with a letter from the Foreign and Defence Secretaries to those Labour MPs voting against the renewal of the Trident system.
claims, it is inferior to the new 14-ton American superbomb publicized the next day.
Sean Pertwee narrates as the docu-drama series examines the Cold War race to build the 'superbomb' - an atomic device.
He also played a key role in planning the ENIAC's successor, the EDVAC, which until the 1980s provided the prototype for nearly all computer logical-control structures--i.e., the famous Won Neumann architecture"--and, during the postwar arms race with the Soviet Union, brought his computer expertise to bear on the hydrogen "superbomb" project at Los Alamos.
View the effects at the "Race for the Superbomb" Web site at www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/ bomb/index.html.)
Robert Oppenheimer, who objected that such a "superbomb" could serve only as a weapon of genocide, not as a useful military device.