supercelestial

supercelestial

(ˌsuːpəsɪˈlɛstɪəl)
adj
1. located above the heavens; above the heavens or celestial regions
2. more than celestial; better than heavenly
References in periodicals archive ?
He described God the Father as creating a world that included "the supercelestial region with intelligences, [where he] enlivened the heavenly globes with eternal souls, and filled the excremental and filthy parts of the lower world with a multitude of forms of animal life." (40) In this passage there is a clear connection between heavenly behavior and the mind and earthly behavior and excremental and animal instincts.
All the same we know from experience that mothers can transmit to the bodies of children in their womb marks connected with their thoughts...." [...] [Martin] Ruland [in his Lexicon alchemiae, 1612/1984] recognizes imagination as part of macrocos-micmicrocosmic theory: "Imaginatio, est astrum in homine, coeleste siue supracoeleste corpus." [...] [The imagination is the star in the human being, the celestial or supercelestial body.] (Weeks 2008: 683, n.
(62) The Council of Laodicea (370) did not refrain from calling the Holy Myron the "supercelestial chrism," in canon 48.
60.2: "He who has but the smallest intelligence will not venture to assert that the Maker and Father of all things, having left all supercelestial matters, was visible on a little portion of the earth"; Dial.
I ask from the intelligible gods fullness of wisdom, from the intellectual gods the power to rise aloft, from the supercelestial gods guiding the universe an activity free and unconcerned with material inquiries, from the gods to who the cosmos is assigned a winged life, from the angelic choruses a true revelation of the divine, from the good daemons an abundant filling of divine inspiration, and from heroes a generous, solemn, and lofty disposition." Translation from G.
Taking cues from the writings of sixteenth-century astronomer, mathematician, and occultist John Dee, three participants sought to reinterpret Dee's "dignification" process for contacting supercelestial beings.
was the loosing of the soul from the body and its flight back to its supercelestial place of origin.
On the other hand we have a decidedly pre-Galilean Ficino, in step with the assumptions of his age, reproving poets for suggesting that things familiar to us in the subcelestial realm could be attributed to supercelestial entities.
In an account of his theological opuscula he described the work as "Concerning Light, which in the divine powers is a rejoicing clarity and a clear joy, but in the fabric of the world is a kind of heavenly mirth arising from the delight of the gods."(61) Light had been an important Neoplatonist metaphor; Ficino elevated it to an imitation of God.(62) A chapter heading announced: "To the joy of the gods their heavenly eyes laugh and with a splendid motion they exult." Ficino traced the source of human sight to the supercelestial spirits, whose perfection of form, fecundity of life, perception of sense, certainty of intelligence, and "fullness of joy" was light.