superdense

su·per·dense

 (so͞o′pər-dĕns′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to an extreme condition in which matter is forced into nonclassical states, as when gravity in a collapsing star crushes electrons and protons together to form neutrons.
2. Of or relating to a quantum computer-coding technique in which two qubits of information are transmitted using one qubit by means of quantum entanglement.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

superdense

(ˌsuːpəˈdɛns)
adj
(Astronomy) astronomy of or relating to an extreme condition in which matter is forced into nonclassical states, as when electrons are forced into protons, leaving only neutrons: superdense matter.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The new study published in the (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/364/6435/66) Journal of Science revealed details about the discovery of a decent-sized object amidst the dusty debris of a superdense stellar corpse.
Thus, if a black hole absorbs matter, then the quasar as a white hole (the superdense body according to Ambartsumyan) generates matter.
Shuryak, "Quantum chromodynamics and the theory of superdense matter," Physics Reports A Review Section of Physics Letters, vol.
Perhaps an eternally inflating, superdense matrix that exists outside, spawning multiverses.
A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope reveals the glowing heart of the supernova, where a superdense neutron star spins surrounded by swirling ionised gas moving at almost the speed of light.
The subtle distortions of spacetime are generated by cataclysmic events such as the collision of black holes or superdense neutron stars, or powerful stellar explosions.
Gravitational waves are theoretically generated by cataclysmic cosmic events such as the collision of black holes or superdense neutron stars.
additional aggregation capacity, and even superdense cities can be
Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the superdense remains of massive stars that have exploded as supernovas.
Depending of the size of the original star, these events result in the creation of either a superdense object called a neutron star, or an even more exotic creature known as a black hole.
Masood, "Renormalization of QED in superdense media," Physical Review D, vol.