superefficiency

superefficiency

(ˌsuːpərɪˈfɪʃənsɪ)
n
the quality or condition of being superefficient
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Hartman, Storbeck, and Byrnes (2001) pointed out that DMUs with superefficiency scores above 2 or 3 may be treated as outliers.
IM first introduced a uniform CI for [[theta].sub.0] under the assumption of asymptotic joint normality of [[??].sub.l], [[??].sub.u] and other assumptions, including superefficiency of the estimator of [DELTA] [equivalent to] [[theta].sub.u]--[[theta].sub.l], where [[??].sub.l], [[??].sub.u] are consistent estimators for [[theta].sub.l], [[theta].sub.u] respectively.
Stoye (2008) pointed out that Assumption IM (iii) is a superefficiency condition on the estimator [??] of the length of the identified interval and may be violated in important applications.
Like Stoye (2008), we show that our CI reduces to that of IM when superefficiency holds.
Drake and Simper (2003a) also demonstrate differences in efficiency estimates across various techniques: CCR specification (DEA), free disposable hull (FDH), Anderson and Peterson (1993) superefficiency, and the parametric stochastic input distance function (SIDF).
Such superefficiency and a radically simplified, software-rich design make the car ready for the hydrogen, with fuel cells small enough to be affordable and hydrogen tanks small enough to fit.
Modern travel thus imagined seems to possess a mixture of attributes: it promises total knowledge in advance and superefficiency in the use of time, yet if these are delivered, there is a loss of the risk that is also deemed essential.