supereminent

su·per·em·i·nent

 (so͞o′pər-ĕm′ə-nənt)
adj.
Preeminent.

su′per·em′i·nence n.
su′per·em′i·nent·ly adv.

supereminent

(ˌsuːpərˈɛmɪnənt)
adj
of distinction, dignity, or rank superior to that of others; pre-eminent
ˌsuperˈeminence n
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References in periodicals archive ?
By the affirmative method, reason progr essively applies to God as their cause and supereminent exemplar the intelligible attributes of creatures; by the negative method these attributes inversely are removed, not because God lacks these perfections, but because he possesses them superabundantly in a manner transcending the mode of creatures and the manner of human cognition.
Trevor Johnson argues that 'Mary's regal status can [...] be read as a sign of her supereminent position among the saints of the Church--a position of such central importance that she [holds] the office of highest authority after that of Christ.' (43) Brown affords her this authority, even in her most humble and vernacular depictions.
The "ever greater dissimilarity" (maior dissimilitudo) here has a positive sense: that of the delimitation of a positive realm into which the creature is "sent forth" for the purpose of "performing a service." "Sent forth" is to say that the creature receives its essential groundedness from the supereminent divine Is [Ist] (Truth, etc.).
It must be related to at least one of what I have described elsewhere as supereminent principles of the law: creating and protecting property interests; creating and protecting liberty interests; fulfilling promises; redressing losses caused by breach or fault; and punishing those who wrong the public.