supererogation


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Related to supererogation: supererogatory

su·per·er·o·gate

 (so͞o′pər-ĕr′ə-gāt′)
intr.v. su·per·er·o·gat·ed, su·per·er·o·gat·ing, su·per·er·o·gates
To do more than is required, ordered, or expected.

[Late Latin superērogāre, superērogāt-, to spend over and above : Latin super-, super- + Latin ērogāre, to spend (ē-, ex-, ex- + rogāre, to ask; see reg- in Indo-European roots).]

su′per·er′o·ga′tion (-gā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

supererogation

(ˌsuːpərˌɛrəˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. the performance of work in excess of that required
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church supererogatory prayers, devotions, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supererogation - an effort above and beyond the call of duty
elbow grease, exertion, effort, travail, sweat - use of physical or mental energy; hard work; "he got an A for effort"; "they managed only with great exertion"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

supererogation

[ˌsuːpərˌerəˈgeɪʃən] Nsupererogación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

supererogation

n (form)Mehrleistung f, → Supererogation (form) f; (Eccl) → freiwillige Gebete pl, → gute Werke pl; an act of supererogationeine Mehrleistung or Supererogation (form)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Some years ago I might have been induced, by an occasion like the present, to attempt a formal refutation of their doctrine; at present it would be a work of supererogation. The wise must bow to the wisdom of such men as Coleridge and Southey, but, being wise, have laughed at poetical theories so prosaically exemplifled.
Astor for his act of supererogation in furnishing orders for the control of the ship while they were on board, instead of leaving them to be the judges where it would be best for her to touch, and how long to remain.
“I would fain establish a right, Natty, to the honor of this death; and surely if the hit in the neck be mine it is enough; for the shot in the heart was unnecessary—what we call an act of supererogation, Leather-Stocking.”
'After premising thus much, it would be a work of supererogation to add, that dust and ashes are for ever scattered
And, therefore, it was thought a matter of supererogation to withdraw the nails and open the windows.
I will now suggest various expansions of the scheme developed so far, beginning with a pervasively overlooked notion that is pivotal to a logic for supererogation and common sense morality.
(1) The fallacy of "above and beyond duty." Superiors claim that personal loyalty fosters supererogation - literally, the act of doing more than duty requires.
First, the issue of supererogation. It has been argued both by Marcia Baron (1987) and Susan Hale (1991) that our ethical theory can and should do without the concept of supererogatory acts, and that most of the work that this concept was supposed to accomplish can be done - and done better - using the concept of imperfect duties.
Moral philosophers have often maintained that, beyond the fundamental requirement not to harm others, positive actions on behalf of the welfare of other persons are frequently discretionary, as suggested by the language of "imperfect duties" or "supererogation," or mediated by professional roles, such as those assumed by health care practitioners.
The concept of aesthetic supererogation offers a new structural framework to understand both the pernicious nature of this oppression and what may be done to mitigate it.
Moreover, it is also likely that many in the developed world view such resource transfers as acts of supererogation and charity, aid out of the goodness of their hearts.
There was neuer papist that so magnified Merits, and talked of his workes of Supererogation, but oftentimes in his conscience hee would surely confesse: That when he had done all, yet he was unprofitable.