superfirm

superfirm

(ˈsuːpəˌfɜːm)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a very large firm or corporation, often incorporating or coordinating a number of smaller firms

superfirm

(ˈsuːpəˌfɜːm)
adj
very firm; extremely firm
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
There are obvious benefits to working with a 'superfirm'.
So, as the rise of the superfirms has inevitably created some giants in the industry, with all of the services and expertise they offer, it may also herald the arrival of more smaller or growing independent players offering an entirely different style of service.
In 2001, David Dunn, who also has been a speaker at the the UO's Warsaw center, left Steinberg's "superfirm" with two other agents.
Mixed government-industry enterprises that have been of central importance in Germany are also left out of his analysis, nor does he explore the management of the innovative superfirm relationships of electrical manufacturers and utilities in Germany and the United States.
He does not, for instance, explore the way in which high-voltage interconnections have been used by management to tie together superfirm enterprises.
Hughes identifies Electric Bond and Share as the superfirm that transcended its multidivisional parent, GE.
Given my definition of the modern industrial enterprise that competed in different national and product markets, I find it difficult to understand Hughes's reference to "post-modern superfirms" or "firm-transcending enterprises, such as trusts, holding companies, and contract-structured production systems." A central theme of Scale and Scope was the transformation of trusts, holding companies, and cartels in the United States and Germany through mergers into modern industrial enterprises.
The third explanation is the rise of superfirms. These very large companies think of Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google [the FAANGs] are consolidating monopoly power.
Will those large firms continue to gobble up the choicest smaller firms to create new superfirms?
The study, by consultants Coopers & Lybrand, added that if companies like Virgin, Tesco, BT and British Gas were to form "superfirms" to supply power, they would be "amazingly successful".
The "new European superfirms did not give rise to a new competitive efficiency in Europe," Paul A.
Both projects were tied to industrial strategies that were basically statist, growth-oriented, and characterized by increasing sectoral concentration and support for superfirms ("national champions").