supergovernment

supergovernment

(ˈsuːpəˌɡʌvəmənt; ˈsuːpəˌɡʌvənmənt)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a large, usually multinational, overarching government, incorporating or connected to a number of governments, such as the EU
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Salceda of the Second District of Albay, a noted economist and disaster-resilience advocate who authored the principal DDR bill (House Bill [HB] 6075), noted that, 'Now, more than ever, we feel the need to create a supergovernment agency, seeing the devastations around us every time disasters strike.' He said the new agency will be 'tasked to carry out a continuous, consistent and fortified calamity-defense program and ensure the country's sustainable development and inclusive growth.'
Bay Area counties would not submit to a regional supergovernment, and regional planning in Los Angeles amounted to county planning.
Perhaps it will have to be, in the beginning, a kind of supergovernment under which both the West Bank and the Gaza Strip keep some kind of autonomy.
Antell, Modern Grand Jury: Benighted Supergovernment, 51 A.B.A.J.
Jessie Sumner said the measure "authorizes the surrender to the new world supergovernment of enough American men and military might to conquer any nation in the world, including the United States." And Ohio's Frederick Smith pointed out that it struck "at the very heart of the Constitution [because] the power to declare war shall be taken from Congress and given to the President." But the House approved the measure by a vote of 344 to 15.
A further reason that creating a supergovernment was considered desirable was that, in Maharashtra, regional indicators of backwardness, essentially determined by the availability of infrastructure, are available only at the district level.
As a consequence, Mayer writes, "The Fed's public image is of a supergovernment that determines the course of economic life, but in fact the Fed today walks softly and carries a small stick" (180).
Although some prominent non-Jews--Eduard Benes of Czechoslovakia, for example--approved the idea, critics said that talk of a Congress, a "world Jewish Parliament and supergovernment," reinforced the accusations against Jews for their unpatriotic behavior.
Metro came under attack by tax reform advocates in 1998 challenging it as an unnecessary "supergovernment" usurping the authority of smaller jurisdictions (Leo, 1998).