supergrowth

supergrowth

(ˈsuːpəˌɡrəʊθ)
n
exceptional growth; very rapid growth
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet despite this success, much remains to be done to turn fast growing firms into supergrowth companies that can have a major and continuing impact on the Welsh economy.
Yet, despite this success, much remains to be done to turn fast-growing firms into supergrowth companies that can have a major and continuing impact on the Welsh economy.
We will have to wait and see whether the Scots now focus their policy efforts on those companies that have the ability and appetite to grow but certainly, there is finally an appreciation in one devolved administration that it can, even without fiscal powers, help develop the indigenous business base and perhaps create some of the real supergrowth companies of the future.
Common spectroscopic techniques are poor at seeing tubes bigger than two nanometers in diameter - or most of the nanotubes in the CVD "supergrowth" process.
"The Baby Sharks: Strategies of Britain's Supergrowth Companies," Long Range Planning26, no.
The June 25, 2007 edition of Fortune stated that "Patiently investing in long-term demographic trends will set up your portfolio for supergrowth."
NEARLY a fifth of Irish businesses are a "supergrowth" company, one of the highest proportions in the world, according to a survey published yesterday.
The 'First Secretary of State', as Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott is now styled when dealing with planning matters, invites local stakeholders to say what arrangements they would prefer for the management of the supergrowth areas in the South East (Thames Gateway, the Milton Keynes sub-region, the London/Stansted/ Cambridge corridor, and Ashford in Kent).
The English "supergrowth" enterprises in the research of Ray and Hutchinson (1983) were primarily motivated to maximize profits or increase sales.
"If you buy a stock that's already down, it will go down far less than the supergrowth stocks," explains Bernadette Murphy, a director at value-oriented money manager M.
These include bigness, as a stand-alone strategy, financial one-stop shopping, attempts at preemptive technological innovation and supergrowth.
If a logarithmic linear trend is chosen since 1850, say, because of a belief in the "reconstruction" hypothesis of Ferenc Janossy, then the interwar period is one of incomplete reconstruction and the post-Second World War age is one of rapid recovery and supergrowth. If a logarithmic curvilinear trend is applied, possibly because of a belief in the long wave hypothesis, then the Depression of the early 1930s and the Nazi Wirtschaftswunder of the 1930s become the anomalous periods to be explained.