superlunary


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su·per·lu·na·ry

 (so͞o′pər-lo͞o′nə-rē) also su·per·lu·nar (-nər)
adj.
Situated beyond the moon.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.superlunary - situated beyond the moon or its orbit around the earthsuperlunary - situated beyond the moon or its orbit around the earth; "who can imagine a translunary visitor in Times Square?"
2.superlunary - unworldly or etherealsuperlunary - unworldly or ethereal; "high translunary dreams"
heavenly - of or belonging to heaven or god
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Correspondingly, 'what of the aether is purer', which both Diogenes and Arius refer to, most probably means the very skies or the superlunary region.
The causal connection between the superlunary and sublunary worlds is rightly presented as a crucial feature of the philosophical cosmology adopted by al-Ghazali.
This new universe defies the ancient authority of Aristotle, who had placed the earth in the terrestrial, or sublunary, region, separate from the other planets located in the celestial, or superlunary, region.
See Nichols, "Ekphrasis, Iconoclasm, and Desire." In glossing the several prominent instances of ekphrasis in the Aeneid, commentators from Fulgentius to Bernard Silvestris emphasized the contrast between the visual and the verbal, or between the superlunary and eternal on one hand and the temporal and terrestrial on the other.
When we turn to passages where Aristotle does mention ether explicitly (De Caelo 2.2 and 2.3), we learn that it is "beyond the bodies that are about us on this earth, different and separate from them" (269b13-16), and found exclusively in the superlunary realm.
This dialogue centered on fundamental Aristotelian ideas, namely, the separation of the universe into sublunary and superlunary regi ons and the idea of celestial incorruptibility.