supernaturalism


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su·per·nat·u·ral·ism

 (so͞o′pər-năch′ər-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality of being supernatural.
2. Belief in a supernatural agency that intervenes in the course of natural laws.

su′per·nat′u·ral·ist n.
su′per·nat′u·ral·is′tic adj.

supernaturalism

(ˌsuːpəˈnætʃrəlɪzəm; -ˈnætʃərə-)
n
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) the quality or condition of being supernatural
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) a supernatural agency, the effects of which are felt to be apparent in this world
3. (Alternative Belief Systems) belief in supernatural forces or agencies as producing effects in this world
ˌsuperˈnaturalist n, adj
ˌsuperˌnaturalˈistic adj

su•per•nat•u•ral•ism

(ˌsu pərˈnætʃ ər əˌlɪz əm, -ˈnætʃ rə-)

n.
1. supernatural character or agency.
2. belief in the doctrine of supernatural or divine agency as manifested in the world.
[1790–1800]
su`per•nat′u•ral•ist, n., adj.
su`per•nat`u•ral•is′tic, adj.

supernaturalism

1. the condition or quality of existing outside the known experience of man or caused by forces beyond those of nature.
2. belief in supernatural events or forces. Also supranaturalism. — supernaturalist, n., adj. — supernatural, supernaturalistic, adj.
See also: Magic
1. the condition or quality of existing outside the known experience of man or caused by forces beyond those of nature.
2. belief in supernatural events or forces. Also supranaturalism.supernaturalist, n., adj.supernatural, supernaturalistic, adj.
See also: Ghosts
1. the condition or quality of existing outside the known experience of man or caused by forces beyond those of nature.
2. belief in supernatural events or forces. Also supranaturalism. — supernaturalist, n., adj.supernatural, supernaturalistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supernaturalism - a belief in forces beyond ordinary human understanding
belief - any cognitive content held as true
magic, thaumaturgy - any art that invokes supernatural powers
occultism - a belief in supernatural powers and the possibility of bringing them under human control
exorcism, dispossession - freeing from evil spirits
2.supernaturalism - the quality of being attributed to power that seems to violate or go beyond natural forces
unnaturalness - the quality of being unnatural or not based on natural principles
References in classic literature ?
His 'Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands,' further, was one of the earliest pieces of modern literature to return for inspiration to the store of medieval supernaturalism, in this case to Celtic supernaturalism.
Nor, in some things, does the common, hereditary experience of all mankind fail to bear witness to the supernaturalism of this hue.
Nuovo judges that a "Christian philosopher in search of promising options" should find Locke's synthesis of reason and faith "congenial" and "useful in promoting intellectual piety." For his own part, however, Nuovo argues that the Christian virtuoso's great project of marrying Christian supernaturalism and atomistic materialism was of "strained plausibility," and indeed that "divorce" between these two elements was "inevitable." Given that judgment, Christian philosophers who take Nuovo's scholarship seriously might understandably look for options more promising than one Nuovo himself ultimately judges a failure.
Dawkins compared the book to Darwin's On the Origin of Species and suggested that it might be cosmology's 'deadliest blow to supernaturalism'.
Ecocentric Humanism is a philosophy that rejects supernaturalism unless this supernaturalism serves a spiritual need in helping humanity reconnect with the global ecological system in which it evolved and still belongs.
Their efforts to make sense of mortality and prepare themselves for the great voyage mix ideology with religious ceremony, and metaphysics and supernaturalism with shamanic ritual.
Despite the stigmatizing fascination with its social innovations (polygamy, communalism), its stark supernaturalism (angels, gold plates, and seer stones), and its most esoteric aspects (a New World Garden of Eden, sacred undergarments), as well as its long-standing outlier status among American Protestants, Professor Givens reminds us that Mormonism remains the most enduring-and thriving-product of the nineteenth-century's religious upheavals and innovations.
He also notes how supernaturalism is tied to Scottish culture and hence to Scottish patriotism.
The humanist label, too quickly associated with the rejection of religion and of supernaturalism, still fails to evoke the ethical framework of our philosophy.
Read carefully, that is what Stark's chapter on Europe demonstrates; conventional church attendance, much less militant Christianity, is not the way the religious revival is occurring there; rather, "church attendance may be low in Europe, but unconventional supernaturalism is thriving." Whether that will be enough to sustain Europe in the face of a dominant secularism and an exploding Islam awaits Stark's next book.