supernova


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su·per·no·va

 (so͞o′pər-nō′və)
n. pl. su·per·no·vae (-vē) or su·per·no·vas
A rare celestial phenomenon involving the explosion of a star and resulting in an extremely bright, short-lived object that emits vast amounts of energy. Depending on the type of supernova, the explosion may completely destroy the star, or the stellar core may survive to become a neutron star.

supernova

(ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə)
n, pl -vae (-viː) or -vas
(Astronomy) a star that explodes catastrophically owing to either instabilities following the exhaustion of its nuclear fuel or gravitational collapse following the accretion of matter from an orbiting companion star, becoming for a few days up to one hundred million times brighter than the sun. The expanding shell of debris (the supernova remnant) creates a nebula that radiates radio waves, X-rays, and light, for hundreds or thousands of years. Compare nova

su•per•no•va

(ˌsu pərˈnoʊ və)

n., pl. -vas, -vae (-vi)
a nova millions of times brighter than the sun.
[1925–30]

su·per·no·va

(so͞o′pər-nō′və)
Plural supernovae (so͞o′pər-nō′vē) or supernovas
A massive star that undergoes a sudden, extreme increase in brightness and releases an enormous burst of energy. This occurs as a result of the violent explosion of most of the material of the star, triggered by the collapse of its core. See more at star. Compare nova. See Note at pulsar.

supernova

A star that explodes and leaves a neutron star remnant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the processsupernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the process
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Translations
supernova
supernowa

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] N (supernovae (pl)) [ˌsuːpəˈnəʊviː] (Astron) → supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpərˈnəʊvə] nsupernova f

supernova

n pl <-s or -e> → Supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] nsupernova
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers have published findings about a supernova observed using TESS, adding new insights to long-held theories about the elements left behind after a white dwarf star explodes into a supernova.
The light from a Type 1a supernova can also be used to measure the (https://www.ibtimes.com/nasa-captures-stunning-photo-entire-night-sky-x-ray-2797110) universe 's expansion rate.
Astronomers at Las Cumbres Observatory have discovered a supernova that has been shining for years instead of mere months, surviving far beyond its expected lifespan.
This isotope is almost exclusively created in supernova explosions.
"Our observations reveal a particular cloud produced by a supernova explosion 10,000 years ago contains enough dust to make 7,000 Earths," Ryan Lau of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, said.
Astronomers have calculated the odds that, sometime during the next 50 years, a supernova occurring in our home galaxy will be visible from Earth.
Saurabh Jha of Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., a member of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) team, said they have found supernovae that can be used like an eye chart for each lensing cluster.
San Jose, CA, July 23, 2012 --(PR.com)-- Super Talent Technology, a leader of NAND Flash storage solutions, today announces their enduring, and most reliable SSD to date, the SATA3 SuperNova.
Perlmutter is at the Supernova Cosmology Project at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, in Berkeley.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-30 June 2008-Nokia introduces the new Supernova range of mobile phones(C)1994-2008 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.m2.com
Technical advances have led to startling findings in such areas of study as high-energy astrophysics, including intensive work on the shock fronts of supernova remnants.