supernova

(redirected from supernovas)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to supernovas: neutron star, Black holes

su·per·no·va

 (so͞o′pər-nō′və)
n. pl. su·per·no·vae (-vē) or su·per·no·vas
A rare celestial phenomenon involving the explosion of a star and resulting in an extremely bright, short-lived object that emits vast amounts of energy. Depending on the type of supernova, the explosion may completely destroy the star, or the stellar core may survive to become a neutron star.

supernova

(ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə)
n, pl -vae (-viː) or -vas
(Astronomy) a star that explodes catastrophically owing to either instabilities following the exhaustion of its nuclear fuel or gravitational collapse following the accretion of matter from an orbiting companion star, becoming for a few days up to one hundred million times brighter than the sun. The expanding shell of debris (the supernova remnant) creates a nebula that radiates radio waves, X-rays, and light, for hundreds or thousands of years. Compare nova

su•per•no•va

(ˌsu pərˈnoʊ və)

n., pl. -vas, -vae (-vi)
a nova millions of times brighter than the sun.
[1925–30]

su·per·no·va

(so͞o′pər-nō′və)
Plural supernovae (so͞o′pər-nō′vē) or supernovas
A massive star that undergoes a sudden, extreme increase in brightness and releases an enormous burst of energy. This occurs as a result of the violent explosion of most of the material of the star, triggered by the collapse of its core. See more at star. Compare nova. See Note at pulsar.

supernova

A star that explodes and leaves a neutron star remnant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the processsupernova - a star that explodes and becomes extremely luminous in the process
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Translations
supernova
supernowa

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] N (supernovae (pl)) [ˌsuːpəˈnəʊviː] (Astron) → supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpərˈnəʊvə] nsupernova f

supernova

n pl <-s or -e> → Supernova f

supernova

[ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə] nsupernova
References in periodicals archive ?
Astrophysicist Mayank Vahia and his colleagues at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research worked backward to see if there were any supernovas bright enough to be seen on the Earth in that time frame.
The thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf star produces such supernovas. Because they explode with nearly uniform brightness, astronomers have used them as cosmic distance markers to track the accelerated expansion of the universe.
Foley calculates that Type Iax supernovas are about a third as common as Type Ia supernovas.
Kathryn Aurora, 10 years old Canadian girl recorded her name to the history as youngest scientist in this area, by discovering one of the big Supernovas.
They had aimed the spacecraft's X-ray telescope at a recently discovered supernova. Supernovas are dramatic explosions that happen when a really big star (as least eight times as big as our sun) runs out of fuel.
Robert Quimby was hunting for supernovas with a tiny telescope, the 18-inch ROTSE-IIIb at McDonald Observatory near Fort Davis, Texas, when he spotted the explosion.
Supernovas are believed to occur when stars reach the end of their lives - the most common type involves a massive one collapsing under its own weight and blowing up.
However, there is an ongoing controversy about Type Ia supernovas. Are they caused by a white dwarf pulling so much material from a companion star that it becomes unstable and explodes?
Understanding the age and mass of stars that die as type 1a supernovas could be critical to revealing the origin of these explosions, says Reynolds.
The astronomers identified 71 supernovas of a certain type known as "1a." These are very old stars that explode when they die.
Scientists have found X-rays bursting out of supernovas for the first time, an unexpected discovery that could change the way astronomers think about these space explosions.