supersalesman

supersalesman

(ˈsuːpəˌseɪlzmən)
n, pl -men
(Commerce) an exceptional salesman
References in periodicals archive ?
Described by one commentator as a "derivative supersalesman" and possessing a photographic memory, Mr Vella agreed the LIA deals were so large they could be called "elephant trades".
Let the salesman become a supersalesman by giving him as much money as his boss's boss.
Four months later, a similarly lofty ambition was promoted at the AU headquarters by China's Premier Li Keqiang, a man Chinese media have dubbed the "high-speed rail supersalesman".
The aggressively charismatic supersalesman is not at all discouraged to find, initially, little demand for his German-manufactured product.
capital needs analysis: Capital needs analysis (CNA) is an appraisal of needs system popularized by supersalesman Tom Wolf.
True to his bloodline -his father Geoffey ran Bradford City to the wreckers yard -dismal Dave announced that a supersalesman had been hired to hawk Leeds players door to door.
Underlying Wall Street's enduring faith--the faith of the industry, investors and certainly the faith of people like Chris Whittle, the supersalesman who created Channel 1, the in-school commercial TV "news" program, and who started Edison and remains its president and CEO--are two unshakable beliefs: (1) that a major shakeup is under way in American education, that the neighborhood school is becoming a thing of the past and that choice, often in privately run schools, is the future; and (2) that through efficiency and smart management, companies like Edison can provide quality education and still make a profit from the same tax dollars and with the same children that public schools have often failed.
Long was "the supersalesman of American politicians" because he appealed to people's "hearts and stomachs and not their heads"("Our Future Dictator": 171).
Recently Gary Melnikoff, an acknowledged LTC insurance expert and industry "supersalesman," agreed to field the "Top 10" negative questions and attitudes from Baby Boomers about long-term care insurance, as determined (unscientifically) by Editor Richard L.
On the other hand, there is Supersalesman, a stock character in the confidence-boosting literature for businessmen which peaked in popularity between the two world wars.
Beierle, whom they call "the supersalesman of low-level nuclear waste," which appeared in a book called "Forevermore: Nuclear Waste in America." The book was not a full length biography as was Caro's and for the life of me I can't figure out why it was included here.
An editor at a major metropolitan daily once referred to Edwards as Atex's "supersalesman." It was the reason Lennane hired him, according to the editor.