superstitious


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su·per·sti·tious

 (so͞o′pər-stĭsh′əs)
adj.
1. Inclined to believe in superstition.
2. Of, characterized by, or proceeding from superstition.

su′per·sti′tious·ly adv.
su′per·sti′tious·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

superstitious

(ˌsuːpəˈstɪʃəs)
adj
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) disposed to believe in superstition
2. of or relating to superstition
ˌsuperˈstitiously adv
ˌsuperˈstitiousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

su•per•sti•tious

(ˌsu pərˈstɪʃ əs)

adj.
1. characterized by or proceeding from superstition: superstitious fears.
2. of or connected with superstition: superstitious tales.
3. believing in or full of superstition.
[1350–1400; < Latin superstitiōsus=superstiti(ō) superstition + -ōsus -ous]
su`per•sti′tious•ly, adv.
su`per•sti′tious•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.superstitious - showing ignorance of the laws of nature and faith in magic or chance; "finally realized that the horror he felt was superstitious in origin"
irrational - not consistent with or using reason; "irrational fears"; "irrational animals"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

superstitious

adjective
1. prone to superstition, naive, gullible Jean was superstitious and believed that green brought bad luck.
2. irrational, unfounded, groundless, unprovable, mythical A wave of superstitious fear spread among the townspeople.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
خُرافيخُرَافِيّ
pověrčivý
overtroisk
taikauskoinen
praznovjeransujevjeran
babonás
hjátrúarfullur
迷信的な
미신적인
poverčivý
vraževeren
vidskeplig
ซึ่งเชื่อโชคลาง
mê tín

superstitious

[ˌsuːpəˈstɪʃəs] ADJsupersticioso
to be superstitious about sthser supersticioso con respecto a algo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

superstitious

[ˌsuːpərˈstɪʃəs] adj [person, beliefs, practices] → superstitieux/euse
to be superstitious about sth → penser que qch porte malheur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

superstitious

adjabergläubisch; superstitious beliefAberglaube m; to be superstitious about somethingin Bezug auf etw (acc)abergläubisch sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

superstitious

[ˌsuːpəˈstɪʃəs] adjsuperstizioso/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

superstition

(suːpəˈstiʃən) noun
1. (the state of fear and ignorance resulting from) the belief in magic, witchcraft and other things that cannot he explained by reason.
2. an example of this type of belief. There is an old superstition that those who marry in May will have bad luck.
ˌsuperˈstitious adjective
superstitious beliefs; She has always been very superstitious.
ˌsuperˈstitiously adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

superstitious

خُرَافِيّ pověrčivý overtroisk abergläubisch προληπτικός supersticioso taikauskoinen superstitieux praznovjeran superstizioso 迷信的な 미신적인 bijgelovig overtroisk przesądny supersticioso суеверный vidskeplig ซึ่งเชื่อโชคลาง batıl inançları olan mê tín 迷信的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

superstitious

a. supersticioso-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Besides, I am extremely superstitious, sufficiently so to respect medicine, anyway (I am well-educated enough not to be superstitious, but I am superstitious).
"Lions have a superstitious terror of my voice," answered the Cock, proudly.
He was an Italian and therefore superstitious. He walked straight into the midst of the guards, who on seeing him were silent.
The Russian was attempting to make travel as difficult as possible for him by turning the natives against him in superstitious fear.
Then Mbonga emerged, a look of mingled wrath and superstitious fear writ upon his hideous countenance.
The disposition which she had herself felt on the previous night, to attach a superstitious importance to the words that Clara had spoken in the trance, had vanished with the return of the morning.
(for the Saxons were very superstitious) might have adopted some such hypothesis, to account for Ivanhoe's disappearance, had he not suddenly cast his eye upon a person attired like a squire, in whom he recognised the features of his fellow-servant Gurth.
Cassy had always kept over Legree the kind of influence that a strong, impassioned woman can ever keep over the most brutal man; but, of late, she had grown more and more irritable and restless, under the hideous yoke of her servitude, and her irritability, at times, broke out into raving insanity; and this liability made her a sort of object of dread to Legree, who had that superstitious horror of insane persons which is common to coarse and uninstructed minds.
Francine's belief in the ghost was too sincerely superstitious to be shaken: she started up in bed.
He was not, in any sense of the term, a superstitious man.
I am not superstitious; I have read a heap of books in my time; I am a scholar in my own way.
In war, he is daring, boastful, cunning, ruthless, self-denying, and self-devoted; in peace, just, generous, hospitable, revengeful, superstitious, modest, and commonly chaste.