superstratum


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su·per·stra·tum

 (so͞o′pər-strā′təm, -străt′əm)
n. pl. su·per·stra·ta (-strā′tə, -străt′ə)
1. One layer or stratum superimposed on another.
2. Linguistics The language of a later, invading people imposed on and leaving features in an indigenous language.

su′per·stra′tal adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

superstratum

(ˌsuːpəˈstrɑːtəm; -ˈstreɪ-)
n, pl -ta (-tə) or -tums
1. (Geological Science) geology a layer or stratum overlying another layer or similar structure
2. (Linguistics) linguistics the language of a conquering or colonizing population as it supplants that of an indigenous population, as for example French and English in the Caribbean. Compare substratum8
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.superstratum - any stratum or layer superimposed on another
stratum - one of several parallel layers of material arranged one on top of another (such as a layer of tissue or cells in an organism or a layer of sedimentary rock)
2.superstratum - the language of a later invading people that is imposed on an indigenous population and contributes features to their language
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

superstratum

[ˌsuːpəˈstrɑːtəm] N (superstratums or superstrata (pl)) [ˌsuːpəˈstrɑːtə]superstrato m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

superstratum

n pl <-strata> (Geol) → obere Schicht; (Ling) → Superstrat nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
with the patent system, all operating beneath a superstratum of
borrowings from an Indo-Aryan superstratum. The Kassites, contemporary
"Substratum y superstratum", en Revista de Filologia Hispanica, Buenos Aires, ano 3, no 3, pp.
About 1kg of fresh composting sample was collected at different locations, namely, substrate (20 cm from bottom), middle-level, and superstratum (20 cm to surface), when the middle-level temperature reached 40[degrees]C in the cooling stage.
The biggest water saturation is 51% when the river bed and bank have a superstratum of asphalt shown in Figure 15.
Inside the LED lead frame, the bottom layer and superstratum were filled with epoxy resin and RGB phosphor resin, respectively.
It seems that the Slavonic-style phonological layer in the Paloc dialect might be explained by a substratum while the large number of Hungarian loanwords in Slovak dialects seems to indicate the existence of a superstratum. However, it is apparent that in some areas villages could have been bilingual for a longer time, as is the case in southern Slovakia even nowadays.
Therefore, the present investigation started with the hypothesis that legal Scots would have a tendency to preserve Latin constructions, and that the burgh laws in Scots would contain borrowings and caiques from the superstratum language.
It seems that Kiswahili as a borrowing language was at the substratum in comparison to the lending languages which were at the superstratum. This made it prestigious to retain the phonotactics of the lending language.
The terms "substratum" and "superstratum," invoked by revisionists to support their argument that Israeli is fundamentally Yiddish, are often used in creolistics and in studies of language evolution to describe the relative influence of one language on another.
Like in France, where the result of the contact of Gaulish Latin, as a spoken substratum, with superstratum Frankish only surfaced in writing in the ninth century after the Carolingian Reform, it needed a strong external impetus to adjust the written language to the spoken practice.