supervene

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su·per·vene

(so͞o′pər-vēn′)
intr.v. su·per·vened, su·per·ven·ing, su·per·venes
1. To come or occur as something extraneous, additional, or unexpected.
2. To follow immediately after; ensue.
3. Philosophy To be dependent on a set of facts or properties in such a way that change is possible only if change occurs in those facts or properties.

[Latin supervenīre : super-, super- + venīre, to come; see gwā- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

su′per·ven′ient (-vēn′yənt) adj.
su′per·ven′ience (-vēn′yəns) n.
su′per·ven′tion (-vĕn′shən) n.

supervene

(ˌsuːpəˈviːn)
vb (intr)
1. to follow closely; ensue
2. to occur as an unexpected or extraneous development
[C17: from Latin supervenīre to come upon, from super- + venīre to come]
ˌsuperˈvenience, supervention n

su•per•vene

(ˌsu pərˈvin)

v.i. -vened, -ven•ing.
1. to take place or occur as something additional or extraneous (sometimes fol. by on or upon).
2. to ensue.
[1640–50; < Latin supervenīre=super- super- + venīre to come]
su`per•ven′tion

supervene


Past participle: supervened
Gerund: supervening

Imperative
supervene
supervene
Present
I supervene
you supervene
he/she/it supervenes
we supervene
you supervene
they supervene
Preterite
I supervened
you supervened
he/she/it supervened
we supervened
you supervened
they supervened
Present Continuous
I am supervening
you are supervening
he/she/it is supervening
we are supervening
you are supervening
they are supervening
Present Perfect
I have supervened
you have supervened
he/she/it has supervened
we have supervened
you have supervened
they have supervened
Past Continuous
I was supervening
you were supervening
he/she/it was supervening
we were supervening
you were supervening
they were supervening
Past Perfect
I had supervened
you had supervened
he/she/it had supervened
we had supervened
you had supervened
they had supervened
Future
I will supervene
you will supervene
he/she/it will supervene
we will supervene
you will supervene
they will supervene
Future Perfect
I will have supervened
you will have supervened
he/she/it will have supervened
we will have supervened
you will have supervened
they will have supervened
Future Continuous
I will be supervening
you will be supervening
he/she/it will be supervening
we will be supervening
you will be supervening
they will be supervening
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been supervening
you have been supervening
he/she/it has been supervening
we have been supervening
you have been supervening
they have been supervening
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been supervening
you will have been supervening
he/she/it will have been supervening
we will have been supervening
you will have been supervening
they will have been supervening
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been supervening
you had been supervening
he/she/it had been supervening
we had been supervening
you had been supervening
they had been supervening
Conditional
I would supervene
you would supervene
he/she/it would supervene
we would supervene
you would supervene
they would supervene
Past Conditional
I would have supervened
you would have supervened
he/she/it would have supervened
we would have supervened
you would have supervened
they would have supervened
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.supervene - take place as an additional or unexpected development
hap, happen, occur, come about, take place, go on, pass off, fall out, pass - come to pass; "What is happening?"; "The meeting took place off without an incidence"; "Nothing occurred that seemed important"

supervene

verb
To occur after in time:
Idiom: follow on the heels of.
Translations

supervene

[ˌsuːpəˈviːn] VIsobrevenir

supervene

References in periodicals archive ?
Global Supervenience without Reducibility, STEPHAN LEUENBERGER
Waldron uses the technical philosophical term supervenience to describe the relationship between the properties and basic equality (pp.
--, 1990, "Supervenience as a Philosophical Concept", Metaphilosophy, vol.
Unlike other metanormative contenders, non-naturalists take normative supervenience to be a relation between metaphysically discontinuous kinds: natural properties and sui generis normative properties.
Before turning to the relevance of these concepts to the evaluation of EP, one additional philosophical term relating to agency and causation needs to be introduced: supervenience (e.g., Kim, 1993, 1996; Murphy, 1998).
Dennis Bielfeldt and Gregersen analyze mind-body supervenience, a concept of growing importance to the religion-science dialogue.
Materialism is committed to a principle of logical supervenience: there can't be two metaphysically possible worlds that agree on the distribution of all basic physical properties but disagree on the distribution of mental properties.
One important reason for this is that the possibility of co-location seems absurd in light of what we might call the "doctrine of microphysical supervenience."(3) My aim in this paper is to briefly describe this doctrine and the problems it is supposed to raise for the co-locationist and then show how one might avoid these problems without rejecting the possibility of co-location.
Variation with respect to the nature of the supervenience base is possible, as long as no modal facts, no primitive dispositions or propensities are allowed among the fundamental properties of the universe.
Supervenience individualism: the facts from individual level fully determine the social facts.
The supervenience problem for intuitionism demands an explanation for how nonnatural moral properties are connected to natural properties.