supine

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su·pine

 (so͞o′pīn′, so͞o-pīn′)
adj.
1. Lying on the back or having the face upward.
2. Having the palm upward. Used of the hand.
3. Marked by or showing lethargy, passivity, or blameworthy indifference: "No other colony showed such supine, selfish helplessness in allowing her own border citizens to be mercilessly harried" (Theodore Roosevelt).
n.
In Latin grammar, a verbal noun used in only a few syntactic constructions and occurring in only two cases, an accusative in -tum or -sum and an ablative in -tū or -sū. The accusative form of the supine is sometimes considered to be the fourth principal part of the Latin verb.

[Middle English supin, Latin verbal noun, from Late Latin supīnum (verbum), (verb) lying on its back, (verb) going back, neuter of Latin supīnus; see upo in Indo-European roots.]

su·pine′ly adv.
su·pine′ness n.

supine

adj
1. lying or resting on the back with the face, palm, etc, upwards
2. displaying no interest or animation; lethargic
n
(Grammar) grammar a noun form derived from a verb in Latin, often used to express purpose with verbs of motion. Abbreviation: sup
[C15: from Latin supīnus related to sub under, up; (in grammatical sense) from Latin verbum supīnum supine word (the reason for this use is unknown)]
suˈpinely adv
suˈpineness n

su•pine

(adj. suˈpaɪn; n. ˈsu paɪn)

adj.
1. lying on the back, face upward.
2.
a. (of the hand) having the palm turned forward or upward.
b. (of the foot) having the sole turned upward or outward.
3. inactive, passive, or inert, esp. from indolence or indifference.
n.
4. (in Latin) a noun form derived from verbs, appearing only in the accusative and the dative-ablative, as dictū in mirābile dictū, “wonderful to say.”
5. (in English) the infinitive of a verb preceded by to.
[1490–1500; < Latin supīnus lying faceup, inactive]
su•pine′ly, adv.
prone, prostrate, supine - Prone is lying on your face—facing downwards—which is also true for prostrate, but only in expressing adoration or begging for protection; supine is lying on your back.
See also related terms for prone.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.supine - lying face upward
unerect - not upright in position or posture
2.supine - offering no resistancesupine - offering no resistance; "resistless hostages"; "No other colony showed such supine, selfish helplessness in allowing her own border citizens to be mercilessly harried"- Theodore Roosevelt
passive, inactive - lacking in energy or will; "Much benevolence of the passive order may be traced to a disinclination to inflict pain upon oneself"- George Meredith

supine

adjective
1. flat on your back, flat, horizontal, recumbent a statue of a supine dog
flat on your back prone, prostrate, lying on your face, face-down
Translations
passiivinensaamaton

supine

[ˈsuːpaɪn]
A. ADJ (frm)
1. (= prostrate) [person, position] → de espaldas, sobre el dorso, supino (more frm)
he lay supine on the couchestaba tendido sobre el dorso or (more frm) en posición supina en el sofá
2. (fig) (= passive) → abúlico
the government's supine response to the rise in petrol pricesla reacción abúlica del gobierno ante la subida de los precios de la gasolina
B. Nsupino m

supine

[suːˈpaɪn]
adj (= lying flat) → couché(e) sur le dos, étendu(e) sur le dos
adv [lie] → sur le dos

supine

adjzurückliegend attr; person (lit)ausgestreckt; (fig)entspannt; (fig liter) lethargyträge, gleichgültig; in a supine positionauf dem Rücken liegend; to be/lie supineauf dem Rücken liegen
n (Gram) → Supinum nt

supine

[ˈsuːpaɪn] adjsupino/a

su·pine

a. supino-a, de posición acostada de espalda, boca arriba y con la palma de la mano hacia arriba.

supine

adj supino, acostado boca arriba
References in classic literature ?
We have stated, likewise, the unfortunate supineness of the American government in neglecting the application of Mr.
This mode has, in such cases, vastly the advantage of elections by the people in their collective capacity, where the activity of party zeal, taking the advantage of the supineness, the ignorance, and the hopes and fears of the unwary and interested, often places men in office by the votes of a small proportion of the electors.
When he returned, to understand how Fanny was situated, and perceived its ill effects, there seemed with him but one thing to be done; and that "Fanny must have a horse" was the resolute declaration with which he opposed whatever could be urged by the supineness of his mother, or the economy of his aunt, to make it appear unimportant.
Discouraged by this supineness on the part of the government, Mr.
Supineness and dogmatism take the place of inquiry.