connective tissue

(redirected from supporting tissue)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

connective tissue

n.
Tissue arising chiefly from the embryonic mesoderm that is characterized by a highly vascular matrix and includes collagenous, elastic, and reticular fibers, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. It forms the supporting and connecting structures of the body.

connective tissue

n
(Zoology) an animal tissue developed from the embryonic mesoderm that consists of collagen or elastic fibres, fibroblasts, fatty cells, etc, within a jelly-like matrix. It supports organs, fills the spaces between them, and forms tendons and ligaments

connec′tive tis`sue


n.
a kind of tissue, usu. of mesoblastic origin, that connects, supports, or surrounds other tissues and organs, including tendons, bone, cartilage, and fatty tissue.
[1880–85]

con·nec·tive tissue

(kə-nĕk′tĭv)
Tissue that forms the framework and supporting structures of the body, including bone, cartilage, mucous membrane, and fat.

connective tissue

1. Tissue that connects parts of the body, e.g. adipose tissue.
2. The body’s most widespread type of tissue: supporting, linking, storing, and holding organs in place. It includes blood, bone, and cartilage.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cellsconnective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
cutis, skin, tegument - a natural protective body covering and site of the sense of touch; "your skin is the largest organ of your body"
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
areolar tissue - fibrous connective tissue with the fibers arranged in a mesh or net
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
bone marrow, marrow - the fatty network of connective tissue that fills the cavities of bones
collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
elastic tissue - connective tissue consisting chiefly of elastic fibers found in the dermis of the skin and in the walls of veins and arteries and in some tendons and ligaments
endoneurium - delicate connective tissue around individual nerve fibers in nerve
ligament - a sheet or band of tough fibrous tissue connecting bones or cartilages or supporting muscles or organs
perineurium - the sheath of connective tissue that covers a bundle of nerve fibers
perimysium - the sheath of connective tissue that covers a bundle of muscle fibers
sinew, tendon - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
submucosa - the connective tissue beneath mucous membrane
histiocyte - a macrophage that is found in connective tissue
ground substance, intercellular substance, matrix - the body substance in which tissue cells are embedded
facia, fascia - a sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue separating or binding together muscles and organs etc
scar tissue - the connective tissue that forms a scar; consists of fibroblasts in new scars and collagen fibers in old scars
labrocyte, mast cell, mastocyte - a large connective tissue cell that contains histamine and heparin and serotonin which are released in allergic reactions or in response to injury or inflammation
granulation, granulation tissue - new connective tissue and tiny blood vessels that form on the surfaces of a wound during the healing process
Translations
pojivová tkáň

connective tissue

nBindegewebe nt
References in periodicals archive ?
3 Seam synthetic, braided, coated, absorbable supporting tissue of 14 days.
Applying EMDOGAIN onto the diseased root surface tricks the body into believing it is forming a new tooth and initiates the natural formation of tooth supporting tissue," said Dr.
1 Pelvic veins are thin-walled, unsupported and are attached relatively weakly to supporting tissue.

Full browser ?