suppressiveness

suppressiveness

(səˈprɛsɪvnəs)
n
the quality of being suppressive
References in periodicals archive ?
Weller DM, Raaijmakers JM, Gardener BBM, Thomashow LS (2002) Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens.
Thomashow, "Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens," Annual Review of Phytopathology, vol.
The establishment and maintenance of these beneficial microorganisms in the soil must be achieved year after year, because in this way biocontrol agents are established and reproducing, thus increasing the soil suppressiveness. Many authors reported that the results from studies using microorganisms are often inconsistent, as these microorganisms fail to always exhibit the same behavioral patterns, either as growth promoters or as pathogen controllers, even when they are subjected to identical testing conditions (CHANWAY et al., 2000; FREITAS et al., 2003).
crenata infestation and its suppressiveness effects on host growth.
Therefore, the improvements of Chuju yields by bio-organic fertilizer in both trial 1 and trial 2 would be due to the suppressiveness of fungal pathogens.
Root zone microflora is responsible for suppressiveness of the white root rot disease in Akwete Rubber Plantations.
However, disease suppressiveness against the plant pathogen Pythium ultimum of the potting mixes linearly increased from 31 to 94% when the compost amendment rate was increased from 20 to 60%.
Van Elsas, "Microbial diversity in soil: selection of microbial populations by plant and soil type and implications for disease suppressiveness," Annual Review of Phytopathology, vol.
Barakat, "The effect of Trichoderma harzianum in combination with organic amendment on soil suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia solani," Phytopathologia Mediterranea, vol.