surface tension


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Related to surface tension: viscosity, capillary action, capillarity

surface tension

n.
1. A property of liquids arising from unbalanced molecular cohesive forces at or near the surface, as a result of which the surface tends to contract and has properties resembling those of a stretched elastic membrane.
2. A measure of this property.

surface tension

n
1. (General Physics) a property of liquids caused by intermolecular forces near the surface leading to the apparent presence of a surface film and to capillarity, etc
2. (General Physics) a measure of this property expressed as the force acting normal to one side of a line of unit length on the surface: measured in newtons per metre. Symbol: T, γ or σ

sur′face ten′sion



n.
the elasticlike force existing in the surface of a body, esp. a liquid, tending to minimize the area of the surface and manifested in capillarity, constriction of the surface, etc.
[1875–80]

sur·face tension

(sûr′fəs)
A property of liquids whereby their surfaces behave as if they were covered by a thin, elastic film. Surface tension is caused by the uneven attraction that molecules at or near the surface of a liquid have for each other. Because of surface tension, small objects can be supported by the surface of a liquid without sinking. Insects, for example, can walk across the surface of a pond because of the surface tension of water. Surface tension also causes drops of a liquid to be shaped like spheres, since spheres have the least amount of surface area possible.

surface tension


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1. Within a liquid, molecules attract each other equally in all directions. At the surface, however, there is no force attracting them outwards, so the molecules are pulled towards the interior of the liquid.
2. The cohesion of a liquid’s surface caused by the inward attraction of its molecules.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.surface tension - a phenomenon at the surface of a liquid caused by intermolecular forces
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
capillarity, capillary action - a phenomenon associated with surface tension and resulting in the elevation or depression of liquids in capillaries
interfacial surface tension, interfacial tension - surface tension at the surface separating two non-miscible liquids
Translations
tension superficielle

surface tension

n (Phys) → tensione f di superficie
References in periodicals archive ?
This next generation HAMR uses multifunctional foot pads that rely on surface tension and surface tension induced buoyancy when HAMR needs to swim but can also apply a voltage to break the water surface when HAMR needs to sink.
The surface of water is covered with an invisible "skin" called SURFACE TENSION. You can imagine surface tension as a sheet of thin rubber stretched tight.
Critique: Written by an author with a genuine flair for narrative driven storytelling, Mike Mullin's "Surface Tension is an inherently engaging read from first page to last in a novel with truly memorable characters, realistic scenarios, and more plot twists and turns than a Cony Island roller coaster.
The classic approach to improve substrate wetting is to use an additive, which reduces the surface tension of the coating to be applied.
A specific concentration of NaCl (2-10%, w/v) was added and surface tension was determined as previously stated.
Dodecyl polyoxyethylene acrylate (DPA) is a nonionic polymerizable surfmer monomer, and its water solution even has high dissolving ability and low surface tension under high mineralization condition.
In all the above studies, the wave motion in the water region is investigated excluding the effect of surface tension and porosity of the bottom.
According to a report by The Verge, the RoboBee weighs just 175 milligrams and at this size, surface tension is like extra strong gravity - this is the 10 times the robot's weight, and three times its lifting power.
For example, water has a surface tension of 73 mJ/[m.sup.2] compared to 20-40 mJ/[m.sup.2] for organic solvents.
To date, the formation of faceted macrosteps near equilibrium has been considered to be due to the effects of anomalous surface tension. 4H-SiC can be used as an example for understanding the importance of controlling the dynamics of macrosteps on a vicinal surface near equilibrium.
The Surface Tension. Using the CSF (continuous-surface-force) method, the expression is

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