swarthiness


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swarth·y

 (swôr′thē)
adj. swarth·i·er, swarth·i·est
Having a dark complexion or color.

[Alteration of swarty, from swart.]

swarth′i·ly adv.
swarth′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swarthiness - a swarthy complexion
complexion, skin color, skin colour - the coloring of a person's face
Translations

swarthiness

[ˈswɔːðɪnɪs] Ntez f morena, color m moreno

swarthiness

n (of skin)Dunkelheit f; (of person also)Dunkelhäutigkeit f, → dunkle Farbe

swarthiness

[ˈswɔːðɪnɪs] n (of person) → carnagione f scura; (of complexion) → colore m scuro
References in classic literature ?
Still all were distinguished by a certain sodden swarthiness of complexion, a filmy dimness of eye, and pallor and compression of lip.
His body seemed leaner, because of the swarthiness of the skin.
But, as if he disdained the usual artifices of his people, he bore none of those strange and horrid devices, with which the children of the forest are accustomed, like the more civilised heroes of the moustache, to back their reputation for courage, contenting himself with a broad and deep shadowing of black, that served as a sufficient and an admirable foil to the brighter gleamings of his native swarthiness.
Among them was Tom Oliver (known as Black Tom for his swarthiness and black hair), who rode three Grand National winners, and guided his friend, Top Pickerell, to have 17 Grand National rides.
He had delicate features, redeemed from effeminacy by the swarthiness of his complexion, and his quick intensity of expression.
Like Twankey, Bernarde's satisfyingly slimy Abanazer is not someone you'd fancy meeting down a dark alley but his Cossack-style swarthiness, his black locks and Machiavellian goatee provide that something-for-the-ladies element, as does Lloyd Grayshon's impressively muscled Genie.
64) Francois-Maximilian Misson's late seventeenth-century New Voyage to Italy challenges these ideas: "Tis also a vulgar error that the Jews are all black; for this is only true of the Portuguese, who marrying always among one another, beget Children like themselves, and consequently the Swarthiness of their complexion is entail'd upon their whole race .
It is against this aesthetic that Greenblatt focuses on the stains, blemishes, swarthiness, wrinkles, and even the moles of Shakespeare's Venus, Rosaline, Cleopatra, the dark-complected mistress of the Sonnets, and Innogen (38).