swayed


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sway

 (swā)
v. swayed, sway·ing, sways
v.intr.
1. To swing back and forth or to and fro. See Synonyms at swing.
2. To incline or bend to one side; veer: She swayed and put out a hand to steady herself.
3.
a. To incline toward change, as in opinion or feeling: He swayed toward trying out for the chorus.
b. To fluctuate, as in outlook.
v.tr.
1. To cause to swing back and forth or to and fro: The breeze swayed the wheat.
2. To cause to incline or bend: The wind swayed the trees toward the house.
3. To exert influence or control over: His speech swayed the voters.
4. Nautical To hoist (a mast or yard) into position.
5. Archaic
a. To rule or govern.
b. To wield, as a weapon or scepter.
n.
1. The act of moving from side to side with a swinging motion.
2. Influence or control: The mayor has a lot of sway in our town.

[Middle English sweien, probably of Scandinavian origin.]

sway′er n.
sway′ing·ly adv.
References in classic literature ?
In the first place, the enormous cutting tackles, among other ponderous things comprising a cluster of blocks generally painted green, and which no single man can possibly lift --this vast bunch of grapes was swayed up to the main-top and firmly lashed to the lower mast-head, the strongest point anywhere above a ship's deck.
Hunt; but there were other considerations, which more strongly swayed his mind.
The plants formed rows on both sides of the road and from each plant rose a dozen or more of the big broad leaves, which swayed continually from side to side, although no wind was blowing.
Swiftly it enveloped her in its embrace, covering her completely in its thick folds, and then it swayed back upon its stem.
I remember how my head swayed with the seas, and the horizon with the sail above it danced up and down; but I also remember as distinctly that I had a persuasion that I was dead, and that I thought what a jest it was that they should come too late by such a little to catch me in my body.
I cannot regret that I enjoyed him so keenly as I did; it was in a way a generous delight, and though he swayed me helplessly whatever way he thought, I do not think yet that he swayed me in any very wrong way.
The crowd swayed a little, and I elbowed my way through.
Without volition I leaned toward her, as a tree is swayed by the wind.
Presently I noted that the sun belt swayed up and down, from solstice to solstice, in a minute or less, and that consequently my pace was over a year a minute; and minute by minute the white snow flashed across the world, and vanished, and was followed by the bright, brief green of spring.
The canoes appeared very black on the white hiss of water; turbaned heads swayed back and forth; a multitude of arms in crimson and yellow rose and fell with one movement; the spearmen upright in the bows of canoes had variegated sarongs and gleaming shoulders like bronze statues; the muttered strophes of the paddlers' song ended periodically in a plaintive shout.