sweathouse


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sweat·house

 (swĕt′hous′)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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The backyard is planted with bougainvillea and cactus, with a swimming pool and a 'temescal', or sweathouse, which is available to non-guests for an hourly fee.
Beavert describes her early life and the traditions in which she was raised, in the framework of the circle of conception, birth, life, and death; she also discusses other traditions, such as the sweathouse, bone games, horses, and foods.
The next interaction involves a man named Untces, with whom Lendix'tcux negotiates the return of Untces' spearhead in exchange for building a sweathouse. (41) Ancillary to this interaction, Lendix'tcux teaches Untces' wife a new method of giving birth, one that does not require her death, as she claimed was the practice her husband employed in the past, amounting to several deceased wives.
Springs possess the purest, strongest, and most spiritually powerful water and are used in the ritual sweathouse, where the water is poured on hot rocks.