sweet chestnut


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Related to sweet chestnut: horse chestnut

sweet chestnut

n.
1. A chestnut tree (Castanea sativa) of the Mediterranean region, bearing edible nuts enclosed in a spiny bur.
2. The nut of this tree. In both senses also called marron, Spanish chestnut.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweet chestnut

n
(Plants) See chestnut1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweet chestnut - wild or cultivated throughout southern Europe, northwestern Africa and southwestern Asiasweet chestnut - wild or cultivated throughout southern Europe, northwestern Africa and southwestern Asia
chestnut tree, chestnut - any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sweet chestnut

n (Bot) → castagno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Previous studies have found similar overestimation in the age of other species, including the sweet chestnut, whose introduction to Britain is commonly attributed to the Romans.
They will only feed on other trees if they run short of oak leaves to eat, and have been seen on hornbeam, hazel, beech, sweet chestnut and birch trees.
View the ancient oak and sweet chestnut trees, some over 500 years old.
With bountiful forests of sweet chestnut trees, it features strongly in Corsican cuisine, from jam, to cakes and biscuits baked with chestnut flour, even in beer.
Roasted chestnuts are a winter favourite and the sweet chestnut Marron De Lyon produces kernels that can be cooked in sugar syrup.
Sweet chestnut blight is a fungus which infects and kills chestnut trees and was accidentally introduced from Asia.
In the 16th century, farmers and landowners were told to plant four trees each year - a sweet chestnut, a fig, a mulberry and an olive tree, and all of these still grow on Corsica today.
Constructed from wood - with plenty of wood used inside the property, including a bespoke sweet chestnut staircase and several feature beams - the house was completed in about nine months in 2009 and is on the market for the first time since then.
The front of the house has a block paved driveway, which leads to the integral wood car port and the oak/ sweet chestnut remote-operated gate to the triple garage, work area and drive of the upper rear garden.
This small, quiet patch of ancient semi-natural woodland at the National Trust site inEast Clandon, was first recorded in the Chertsey Chronicles during the 13th century and features sweet chestnut, ash, oak, birch and hornbeam.