sweet cicely


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sweet cic·e·ly

 (sĭs′ə-lē)
n.
1. Any of various aromatic North American perennial plants of the genus Osmorhiza of the parsley family, having compound leaves and clusters of small usually white flowers.
2. An aromatic European perennial plant (Myrrhis odorata) in the parsley family, having compound leaves and compound umbels of small white flowers. Also called myrrh2.

[Middle English seseli, from Latin seselis, from Greek.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweet cicely

n
1. (Plants) Also called: myrrh an aromatic umbelliferous European plant, Myrrhis odorata, having compound leaves and clusters of small white flowers
2. (Cookery) the leaves of this plant, formerly used in cookery for their flavour of aniseed
3. (Plants) any of various plants of the umbelliferous genus Osmorhiza, of Asia and America, having aromatic roots and clusters of small white flowers
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweet cicely - European herb with soft ferny leaves and white flowers
sweet cicely - fresh ferny leaves and green seeds used as garnish in salads and cold vegetables; dried seeds used in confectionery and liqueurs
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Myrrhis, Myrrhis - European perennial herbs having pinnate leaves and umbels of white flowers
2.sweet cicely - aromatic resin that is burned as incense and used in perfumesweet cicely - aromatic resin that is burned as incense and used in perfume
Commiphora myrrha, myrrh tree - tree of eastern Africa and Asia yielding myrrh
gum resin - a mixture of resin and gum
3.sweet cicely - fresh ferny leaves and green seeds used as garnish in salads and cold vegetables; dried seeds used in confectionery and liqueurs
herb - aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities
Myrrhis odorata, sweet cicely - European herb with soft ferny leaves and white flowers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Umbellifers such as fennel, dill, angelica, parsley, sweet cicely, cow parsley and anthriscus are all ideal and make great companion plants for the veg plot.
As well as containing all the botanicals used in their famous Rock Rose recipe, the gin contains three additional herbs - sweet cicely, which grows beside hedgerows around the castle, applemint from local forest areas and bog myrtle, which is sourced from around the walls of the castle itself.
Add these--plus seed heads of fennel, sweet cicely, and yarrow--to flower arrangements, garlands, swags, and wreaths.
These botanicals, endemic to the Scottish island, are apple mint, sweet chamomile, creeping thistle, downy birch, elder, gorse, hawthorn, heather, juniper, lady's bedstraw, lemon balm, meadowsweet, mugwort, red clover, spearmint, sweet cicely, bog myrtle (sweet gale), tansy, water mint, white clover, wild thyme, and wood sage.
EX-TOMORROW'S World presenter Judith Hann used to spend her time in a TV studio, but these days she's out in her garden, growing more than 150 culinary herbs including borage, sweet cicely and others which taste great but aren't widely available in supermarkets.
The larva feed on the foliage of dill, parsley, fennel, goutweed, angelica, sweet cicely and many other members of the umbels family.
My wife had ravioli of West Coast crab, fennel, sweet cicely, cucumber, spinach and shellfish sauce.
Lawton (publications manager, Missouri Botanical Garden) introduces plants, that if combined in a bouquet, would send decidedly mixed messages; sweet cicely and parsley have pleasant connotations, while Conium maculatum is the poison hemlock that killed Socrates.