sweet flag

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sweet flag

n.
1. A perennial herb (Acorus calamus) native to Eurasia and naturalized in North America, growing in marshy places and having grasslike leaves, minute greenish flowers borne on a thick spadix, and aromatic rhizomes used in medicine and perfumery. Also called calamus.
2. A similar plant (Acorus americanus) native to North America.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweet flag

n
(Plants) an aroid marsh plant, Acorus calamus, having swordlike leaves, small greenish flowers, and aromatic roots. Also called: calamus
[C18: see flag2]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweet flag - perennial marsh plant having swordlike leaves and aromatic rootssweet flag - perennial marsh plant having swordlike leaves and aromatic roots
Acorus, genus Acorus - sweet flags; sometimes placed in subfamily Acoraceae
calamus - the aromatic root of the sweet flag used medicinally
calamus oil - carcinogenic oil from calamus root used as a perfume
bog plant, marsh plant, swamp plant - a semiaquatic plant that grows in soft wet land; most are monocots: sedge, sphagnum, grasses, cattails, etc; possibly heath
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Instead of the white lily, which requires mud, or the common sweet flag, the blue flag (Iris versicolor) grows thinly in the pure water, rising from the stony bottom all around the shore, where it is visited by hummingbirds in June; and the color both of its bluish blades and its flowers and especially their reflections, is in singular harmony with the glaucous water.
Cili Kaimas is a good place to try a wide variety of Lithuanian cuisine including the "Naked maids in sweet flags" dish, with chicken in chanterelle sauce.
Figure 3 shows the colonies of microorganism isolated from sweet flags root and figure5 shows the species responsible for atrazine degradation.