sweet gum


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sweet gum
Liquidambar styraciflua

sweet gum

or sweet·gum (swēt′gŭm′)
n.
1. Any of several trees of the genus Liquidambar, especially L. styraciflua of North America and Central America, having palmately lobed leaves, prickly round hanging fruit, and wood formerly used to make furniture.
2. The aromatic resin obtained from this tree.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweet gum

n
1. (Plants) a North American liquidambar tree, Liquidambar styraciflua, having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sap: the wood (called satin walnut) is used to make furniture. Compare sour gum
2. (Elements & Compounds) the sap of this tree
Often shortened to: red gum
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sweet′ gum′


n.
1. a tall, aromatic tree, Liquidambarstyraciflua, of the witch hazel family, native to the eastern U.S., with star-shaped leaves and fruits in rounded, burlike clusters.
2. the hard reddish brown wood of this tree, used for making furniture.
3. the amber balsam exuded by this tree, used in perfumes and medicines.
Also called red gum (for defs. 1,2).
[1690–1700, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweet gum - reddish-brown wood and lumber from heartwood of the sweet gum tree used to make furnituresweet gum - reddish-brown wood and lumber from heartwood of the sweet gum tree used to make furniture
gumwood, gum - wood or lumber from any of various gum trees especially the sweet gum
2.sweet gum - aromatic exudate from the sweet gum treesweet gum - aromatic exudate from the sweet gum tree
American sweet gum, bilsted, Liquidambar styraciflua, sweet gum tree, sweet gum, red gum - a North American tree of the genus Liquidambar having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sap
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
3.sweet gum - a North American tree of the genus Liquidambar having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sapsweet gum - a North American tree of the genus Liquidambar having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sap
liquidambar - any tree of the genus Liquidambar
liquidambar, sweet gum - aromatic exudate from the sweet gum tree
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The upright white hewn studs and freshly planed door and window casings gave it a clean and airy look, especially in the morning, when its timbers were saturated with dew, so that I fancied that by noon some sweet gum would exude from them.
The taste for sweet gum has become a mainstay in the candy market, accounting for 11% of today's candy sales.
Rick Cauthen, of Coldwell Banker Commercial Caine, represented Pimpernal LLC in the sale of 6.32 acres at 101 Sweet Gum Valley Road in Travelers Rest to Harold C.
Nearby are tulip poplar, beech, sweet gum, maple, white cedars, and other species.
The event included the planting of three sapling American Sweet Gum trees, in recognition of 3M's US heritage.
Liquid Amber is the automaker's seventh exclusive veneer, and it is named after the resin from the American Red Gum tree, which is also known as the American Sweet Gum.
LIQUIDAMBAR Sweetgum Liquidambar, or Sweet Gum, is a majestic tree, reaching over 20 metres in height when fully matured.
He then visited the Aberfan Memorial Garden and planted a sweet gum tree next to one planted by the Queen in 1997.
The shallow drainage ditch that bisected our study site had a 1 m wide band of 4 to 6 m sweet gum (Liquidambar slyraciflua) trees in and next to the ditch, just beyond the plow zone.
What I'd long imagined were mature oak groves in the distance turned out to be middle-aged stands of sweet gum. With no abundant food sources, little bedding cover and limited water present, it didn't surprise me that I'd found two small rubs on that entire piece of ground.