sweet gum

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sweet gum
Liquidambar styraciflua

sweet gum

or sweet·gum (swēt′gŭm′)
n.
1. Any of several trees of the genus Liquidambar, especially L. styraciflua of North America and Central America, having palmately lobed leaves, prickly round hanging fruit, and wood formerly used to make furniture.
2. The aromatic resin obtained from this tree.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweet gum

n
1. (Plants) a North American liquidambar tree, Liquidambar styraciflua, having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sap: the wood (called satin walnut) is used to make furniture. Compare sour gum
2. (Elements & Compounds) the sap of this tree
Often shortened to: red gum
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sweet′ gum′


n.
1. a tall, aromatic tree, Liquidambarstyraciflua, of the witch hazel family, native to the eastern U.S., with star-shaped leaves and fruits in rounded, burlike clusters.
2. the hard reddish brown wood of this tree, used for making furniture.
3. the amber balsam exuded by this tree, used in perfumes and medicines.
Also called red gum (for defs. 1,2).
[1690–1700, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweet gum - reddish-brown wood and lumber from heartwood of the sweet gum tree used to make furnituresweet gum - reddish-brown wood and lumber from heartwood of the sweet gum tree used to make furniture
gumwood, gum - wood or lumber from any of various gum trees especially the sweet gum
2.sweet gum - aromatic exudate from the sweet gum treesweet gum - aromatic exudate from the sweet gum tree
American sweet gum, bilsted, Liquidambar styraciflua, sweet gum tree, sweet gum, red gum - a North American tree of the genus Liquidambar having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sap
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
3.sweet gum - a North American tree of the genus Liquidambar having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sapsweet gum - a North American tree of the genus Liquidambar having prickly spherical fruit clusters and fragrant sap
liquidambar - any tree of the genus Liquidambar
liquidambar, sweet gum - aromatic exudate from the sweet gum tree
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The upright white hewn studs and freshly planed door and window casings gave it a clean and airy look, especially in the morning, when its timbers were saturated with dew, so that I fancied that by noon some sweet gum would exude from them.
Nevertheless, the patterns were similar to 2005, with the majority of egg cases found on the tallest and most common trees: sweet gums and loblolly pines.
Best of the Bunch Sweet gums FOR the ultimate example of trees producing autumn foliage colour, the Sweet Gum, Liquidambar styraciflua, has to take top prize.
Memorial landscape architect Peter Walker said Swamp White Oaks and Sweet Gums were chosen for their health and durability but also becuase they are "graceful and hopeful symbols of life and longevity."
They shove him toward the sweet gums where his soap soldiers wrestle with twigs.
the rifle, and all ten of us ambled past the barn into the woods in search of two prized cedars lurking in exile near the density of the oaks, sweet gums, and pines.
Mike Perkins of the county's vegetation staff said Thursday that the trees - fast-growing sweet gums with highly intrusive root systems - never should have been planted in the subdivision just northwest of the intersection of Belt Line and River roads.
The book The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Trees, Timbers and Forests of the World, by Herbert Edlin and Maurice Nimomo, explains the name sweet gum. "Sweet gums are so called because they exude a fragrant yellow resinous gum."
Many trees of lesser height--pears, pin oaks, kousa dogwoods, sweet gums, and others--were planted to make a grand total of 110, adding to the lush landscapping.