sweetfish


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sweetfish

(ˈswiːtˌfɪʃ)
n
(Animals) a sweet-tasting omnivorous fish, native to Japan
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
ayu
References in periodicals archive ?
After about two hours looking around the farm and also talking to Bae about hanyakwoo, Ryu headed to a sweetfish farm nearby run by Hong Joo-seon, a sweetfish expert of 30 years and a passionate entrepreneur in his 60s striving to make the fish known to more people.
Ryu uses sweetfish as one of the 20 courses on his menu at Ryunique.
At Ryunique, regional ingredients such as sweetfish are identified on a small map placed on the table to educate customers about where the food comes from.
Before the yakimono or grilled course, a young chef came in with a basket of jumping sweetfish or ayu, as if to show us how fresh the next dish was going to be.
The ''Hanabiwa Musume'' (flower daughter at Lake Biwa) lunchbox priced at 2,830 yen, available at the Taga Service Area on the Meishin Expressway, includes Omi beef, a specialty in Shiga Prefecture, and ayu (sweetfish).
Freshwater fishermen and riverfront farmers have joined hands to revive the ayu, or Japanese sweetfish, called ''Queen of Limpid Stream,'' catches of which have declined dramatically due to environmental degradation in the Monobe River in the city of Konan, Kochi Prefecture.
Nishida, 50, was recognized for his analyses of the genetic structures of freshwater and seawater fish in Japan and overseas, in particular for proving the uniqueness of ayu (sweetfish) in Lake Biwa from other ayu found in Japan's rivers and streams.
''Young clams and freshwater sweetfish grow at the mouth of the Yahagi River,'' Iseki said.
His baby sweetfish documentary stunned the audience, because the fish, still alive, was coated in flour and then fried.
Guests can sample delicious rustic fare such as ''ayu'' (sweetfish), mountain greens and grilled miso on magnolia leaves served around a sunken hearth.