swig

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swig

 (swĭg) Informal
n.
A deep draft, especially of liquor; a gulp.
tr. & intr.v. swigged, swig·ging, swigs
To drink (liquid) or engage in drinking liquid in great gulps.

[Origin unknown.]

swig′ger n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

swig

(swɪɡ)
n
a large swallow or deep drink, esp from a bottle
vb, swigs, swigging or swigged
to drink (some liquid) deeply, esp from a bottle
[C16: of unknown origin]
ˈswigger n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

swig

(swɪg)

n., v. swigged, swig•ging. Informal. n.
1. an amount of liquid, esp. liquor, taken in one swallow.
v.t., v.i.
2. to drink heartily or greedily.
[1540–50; orig. uncertain]
swig′ger, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

swig


Past participle: swigged
Gerund: swigging

Imperative
swig
swig
Present
I swig
you swig
he/she/it swigs
we swig
you swig
they swig
Preterite
I swigged
you swigged
he/she/it swigged
we swigged
you swigged
they swigged
Present Continuous
I am swigging
you are swigging
he/she/it is swigging
we are swigging
you are swigging
they are swigging
Present Perfect
I have swigged
you have swigged
he/she/it has swigged
we have swigged
you have swigged
they have swigged
Past Continuous
I was swigging
you were swigging
he/she/it was swigging
we were swigging
you were swigging
they were swigging
Past Perfect
I had swigged
you had swigged
he/she/it had swigged
we had swigged
you had swigged
they had swigged
Future
I will swig
you will swig
he/she/it will swig
we will swig
you will swig
they will swig
Future Perfect
I will have swigged
you will have swigged
he/she/it will have swigged
we will have swigged
you will have swigged
they will have swigged
Future Continuous
I will be swigging
you will be swigging
he/she/it will be swigging
we will be swigging
you will be swigging
they will be swigging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been swigging
you have been swigging
he/she/it has been swigging
we have been swigging
you have been swigging
they have been swigging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been swigging
you will have been swigging
he/she/it will have been swigging
we will have been swigging
you will have been swigging
they will have been swigging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been swigging
you had been swigging
he/she/it had been swigging
we had been swigging
you had been swigging
they had been swigging
Conditional
I would swig
you would swig
he/she/it would swig
we would swig
you would swig
they would swig
Past Conditional
I would have swigged
you would have swigged
he/she/it would have swigged
we would have swigged
you would have swigged
they would have swigged
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swig - a large and hurried swallowswig - a large and hurried swallow; "he finished it at a single gulp"
deglutition, swallow, drink - the act of swallowing; "one swallow of the liquid was enough"; "he took a drink of his beer and smacked his lips"
Verb1.swig - strike heavily, especially with the fist or a bat; "He slugged me so hard that I passed out"
hit - deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"
2.swig - to swallow hurriedly or greedily or in one draught; "The men gulped down their beers"
drink, imbibe - take in liquids; "The patient must drink several liters each day"; "The children like to drink soda"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

swig

noun
Informal. An act of drinking or the amount swallowed:
Slang: belt.
verb
Informal. To take into the mouth and swallow (a liquid):
Informal: toss down (or off).
Slang: belt.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
جُرْعَهيَجْرَع، يَغِبُّ
hltlít do sebe
tylle i sig
huikkakulauskulauttaaryypätäryyppy
húz: nagyokat húzkorty: nagy korty
òamba, teygateygur
gurkšnoti
malkotmalkssūkt
liať do seba

swig

[swɪg]
A. VTbeber (a tragos)
B. Ntrago m
have a swig of thisbébete un poco de esto
he took a swig from his flaskse echó un trago de la botella
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

swig

[ˈswɪg]
n (= drink) → lampée f
vtlamper
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

swig

(inf)
nSchluck m; to have or take a swig of beereinen Schluck Bier trinken; to have or take a swig from a bottleeinen Schluck aus einer Flasche trinken; have a swig of thistrinken Sie mal einen Schluck (davon) (inf); to down a drink in one swigdas Glas in einem Zug leeren
vt (also swig down)herunterkippen (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

swig

[swɪg] (fam)
1. n (drink) → sorsata
he took a swig at his bottle → ha bevuto un lungo sorso dalla bottiglia
2. vttracannare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

swig

(swig) past tense, past participle swigged verb
to drink. He's in the bar swigging beer.
noun
a long gulp. He took a swig from the bottle.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The cobbler wrought upon a shoe; the blacksmith hammered his iron, the soldier waved his glittering blade; the lady raised a tiny breeze with her fan; the jolly toper swigged lustily at his bottle; a scholar opened his book with eager thirst for knowledge, and turned his head to and fro along the page; the milkmaid energetically drained her cow; and a miser counted gold into his strong-box,--all at the same turning of a crank.
But the difference between them lay in this: that whereas Mr Willet's extreme sagacity and acuteness were the efforts of unassisted nature, the Lion stood indebted, in no small amount, to beer; of which he swigged such copious draughts, that most of his faculties were utterly drowned and washed away, except the one great faculty of sleep, which he retained in surprising perfection.