swindler


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Related to swindler: Gypsy, Bernie Madoff

swin·dle

 (swĭn′dl)
v. swin·dled, swin·dling, swin·dles
v.tr.
1. To cheat or defraud of money or property.
2. To obtain by fraudulent means: swindled money from the company.
v.intr.
To practice fraud as a means of obtaining money or property.
n.
The act or an instance of swindling.

[Back-formation from swindler, one who swindles, from German Schwindler, giddy person, cheat, from schwindeln, to be dizzy, swindle, from Middle High German, from Old High German swintilōn, frequentative of swintan, to disappear.]

swin′dler n.

swindler

, swindle - Swindler and swindle are from German Schwindler, "promoter of wild schemes; cheat."
See also related terms for swindle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swindler - a person who swindles you by means of deception or fraud
card shark, card sharp, card sharper, cardsharp, cardsharper, sharper, sharpie, sharpy - a professional card player who makes a living by cheating at card games
clip artist - a swindler who fleeces the victim
con artist, con man, confidence man - a swindler who exploits the confidence of his victim
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
welcher, welsher - someone who swindles you by not repaying a debt or wager

swindler

noun cheat, fraud, hustler (U.S. informal), con man (informal), sharper, shark, rogue, charlatan, rook (slang), rascal, trickster, impostor, fraudster, knave (archaic), confidence trickster, mountebank, grifter (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), chiseller (informal) Swindlers have cheated investors out of £12 million.

swindler

noun
Translations
غَشّاش، مُحْتال، مُخادِع
podvodník
svindler
svindlari
goljuf

swindler

[ˈswɪndləʳ] Nestafador(a) m/f, timador(a) m/f

swindler

[ˈswɪndlər] nescroc m

swindler

nSchwindler(in) m(f), → Gauner(in) m(f) (inf)

swindler

[ˈswɪndləʳ] nimbroglione/a, truffatore/trice

swindle

(ˈswindl) verb
to cheat. That shopkeeper has swindled me!; He swindled me out of $4.
noun
an act or example of swindling; a fraud. an insurance swindle; Our new car's a swindle – it's falling to pieces.
ˈswindler noun
a person who swindles.
References in classic literature ?
Populace-hodgepodge: therein is everything mixed with everything, saint and swindler, gentleman and Jew, and every beast out of Noah's ark.
That was so far well, but Vronsky knew that in this dirty business, though his only share in it was undertaking by word of mouth to be surety for Venovsky, it was absolutely necessary for him to have the two thousand five hundred roubles so as to be able to fling it at the swindler, and have no more words with him.
Monsieur Stangerson, on making inquiries as to Monsieur Jean Roussel, found that the man was a swindler and an adventurer.
Here a red-nosed publican shouting the praises of his vats and there a temperance lecturer at 50 pounds a night; here a judge and there a swindler; here a priest and there a gambler.
Perhaps, instead of being a millionaire, you yourself are a swindler and an adventurer!"
Dost thou not see- shortsighted being that thou art, and unlucky mortal that I am!- that if they perceive thee to be a coarse clown or a dull blockhead, they will suspect me to be some impostor or swindler? Nay, nay, Sancho friend, keep clear, oh, keep clear of these stumbling-blocks; for he who falls into the way of being a chatterbox and droll, drops into a wretched buffoon the first time he trips; bridle thy tongue, consider and weigh thy words before they escape thy mouth, and bear in mind we are now in quarters whence, by God's help, and the strength of my arm, we shall come forth mightily advanced in fame and fortune."
The newspapers laughed the wretched upstart and swindler to scorn.
Having taken this little liberty with the Patriarchal person, Mr Pancks further astounded and attracted the Bleeding Hearts by saying in an audible voice, 'Now, you sugary swindler, I mean to have it out with you!'
"Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has any idea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are many people going about who tell such plausible stories that it is very hard to see through them, but there is a style about your language which assures me of your good disposition.
They were swindlers and thieves of pennies and dimes, and they had been trapped and put out of the way by the swindlers and thieves of millions of dollars.
As a rule they are either fools or swindlers! Listen to me and go home."
"My God!" exclaimed May, "and von Horn was accredited to be one of the shrewdest swindlers and adventurers in America!