sycophantism

sycophantism

the practice of self-serving or servile flattery. Also called sycophancy. — sycophant, n.sycophantic, adj.
See also: Behavior
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Further, the novel proves that the subtle conceit of Wickham and the obsequious pride of Collins toward those who have given them gifts extend, in the case of Wickham, from an egotistical and practically hedonistic selfishness, and, in the case of Collins, from a straining and enslaving sycophantism. Most telling, for example, is Elizabeth's evocative remark to Darcy about Lady Catherine's interest in improvements to the rectory at Hunsford: "I am sure she could not have bestowed her kindness on a more grateful object." (32) Lady Catherine, in pride, seeks to reinforce her power and to objectify--and bind--Collins through her influence and "gifts." Her gifts, however, plainly come with expectations, and hence are really not gifts at all.
Indeed, the world of science--supposedly inherited, both arbitrarily and qualifyingly, from the "ancients" and the more recent "Aufklarung", just like the world of philosophy--still inherently suffers from mere syllogism and solipsism, albeit in a different intellectual category than other types of solipsism, thereby often resulting in advanced opaque types of dogmatism, absolutism, and relativism, and in the said types of sycophantism and sophism.
Taxpayer money to supposedly non-ideological charities, however, is creating unhealthy sycophantism.