syllabism

syl·la·bism

 (sĭl′ə-bĭz′əm)
n.
1. Division of a word or phrase into syllables.
2. Use of syllabic characters in writing.

[Latin syllaba, syllable; see syllable + -ism.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

syllabism

(ˈsɪləˌbɪzəm)
n
(Linguistics) use of a writing system consisting of characters for syllables rather than for individual sounds or whole words. Also called: syllabography
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

syllabism

1. the use of characters in writing that represent syllables rather than individual sounds, as in the Cherokee syllabary.
2. a division of a word into syllables.
See also: Writing
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Syllabism is a phenomenon that can occur in a distance education course; it is the inclination for students to focus solely on the syllabus assignments rather than interact and actually learn the material presented.
The phenomenon of syllabism is an ever-present threat to the success of distance learning outcomes (Beaudoin, 1990).