symbiosis

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sym·bi·o·sis

 (sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. sym·bi·o·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

[Greek sumbiōsis, companionship, from sumbioun, to live together, from sumbios, living together : sun-, syn- + bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

(ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs; ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Biology) a close and usually obligatory association of two organisms of different species that live together, often to their mutual benefit
2. (Sociology) a similar relationship between interdependent persons or groups
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: a living together; see symbiont]
ˌsymbiˈotic, ˌsymbiˈotical adj

sym•bi•o•sis

(ˌsɪm biˈoʊ sɪs, -baɪ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1.
a. the living together of two dissimilar organisms, as in mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism.
b. (formerly) mutualism.
2. any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.
[1615–25; < Greek symbíōsis=symbiō-, variant s. of symbioûn to live together (sym- sym- + bioûn to live) + -sis -sis]
sym`bi•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) sym`bi•ot′i•cal, adj.
sym`bi•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs)
The close association between two or more different organisms of different species, often but not necessarily benefiting each member.

symbiotic adjective
Did You Know? Two organisms that live together in symbiosis may have one of three kinds of relationships: mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism. The mutualism shown by the rhinoceros and the tickbird benefits both. Riding on the rhino's back, the tickbird eats its fill of the ticks that bother the rhino while the rhino gets warning calls from the bird when it senses danger. In commensalism, one member benefits and the other is unaffected. Certain barnacles attach themselves to whales, gaining a safe home and transportation to food-rich waters. But the whales are generally unaffected by the barnacles' presence. In parasitism, though, one species generally gets hurt, as when fleas infest a dog's coat and feed on its blood.

symbiosis

a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to none of them. — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Organisms
the living together of two dissimilar organisms; the relationship may be beneficial to both (mutualism and symbiosis), beneficial to one without effect on the other (commensalism), beneficial to one and detrimental to the other (parasitism), detrimental to the first without any effect on the other (amensalism), or detrimental to both (synnecrosis). — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Biology

symbiosis

The living together of two organisms from different species for mutual benefit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbiosis - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] Nsimbiosis f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs] n
(between organisms)symbiose f
(between people, organizations, systems)symbiose f

symbiosis

nSymbiose f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] nsimbiosi f inv

sym·bi·o·sis

n. simbiosis, unión estrecha de dos organismos que pertenecen a especies diferentes.

symbiosis

n (psych, etc.) simbiosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
In plants, some symbioses occur through the formation of specialized joint bodies such as nodules Fabaceae and mycorrhizae of most plants [29,31,12,14].
Through a range of symbioses (some brief, some lifelong), microbes have collaborated with all types of life on Earth to create new, emergent forms, including human beings.
The field of symbioses has seen such waves, and it has also seen the flat times.
For example, toeing a thin line between the cartoonish whimsy of children's coloring books and the shear weight of nineteenth-century slave narratives, the painter John Bankton is described by writer Christine Kim as "playing a tug of war between language and imagery [that] leads the viewer to question his/her own morality" yet at the same time the artist "reminds us that symbioses and multiplicity are much more appealing" than the often regimented ways in which we receive information from the mass media.
This begins with animal-man symbioses, like a Hundemensch (Dog-man) walking upright, with a human face and hanging, floppy ears, and continues with the Mausekind (Mouse-child), a mouse that carries a rotund child's face within its gaping maw.
fischeri should serve as a research model for other animal-bacteria symbioses, including those that occur inside humans, says McFall-Ngai.
Perhaps the most interesting feature of symbioses from the perspective of ecologists is that they often give one or both participants in the interaction access to novel metabolic capabilities.
proteus and other fascinating symbioses can be interrogated by a range of high-throughput methods that reveal the total (or near-total) complement of a particular class of biological molecules: genes, transcripts, proteins, lipids, metabolites, etc.
Despite the importance of corals to coral reefs and the increasing threats that reef ecosystems face due to climate change and other environmental perturbation, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie coral-algal symbioses are just beginning to be understood (Davy et al.
These symbioses have a nutritional basis, with evidence that the algal cells release substantial amounts of photosynthate to the host and may also recycle nitrogen (Muscatine, 1990; Wang and Douglas, 1998).
Algal-cnidarian symbioses are characterized by long-term stability wherein neither partner outgrows the other, and where algal population densities remain relatively constant (Drew, 1972; Pardy, 1974; Davies, 1984).