symbiosis


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sym·bi·o·sis

 (sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. sym·bi·o·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

[Greek sumbiōsis, companionship, from sumbioun, to live together, from sumbios, living together : sun-, syn- + bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

symbiosis

(ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs; ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Biology) a close and usually obligatory association of two organisms of different species that live together, often to their mutual benefit
2. (Sociology) a similar relationship between interdependent persons or groups
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: a living together; see symbiont]
ˌsymbiˈotic, ˌsymbiˈotical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sym•bi•o•sis

(ˌsɪm biˈoʊ sɪs, -baɪ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1.
a. the living together of two dissimilar organisms, as in mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism.
b. (formerly) mutualism.
2. any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.
[1615–25; < Greek symbíōsis=symbiō-, variant s. of symbioûn to live together (sym- sym- + bioûn to live) + -sis -sis]
sym`bi•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) sym`bi•ot′i•cal, adj.
sym`bi•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs)
The close association between two or more different organisms of different species, often but not necessarily benefiting each member.

symbiotic adjective
Did You Know? Two organisms that live together in symbiosis may have one of three kinds of relationships: mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism. The mutualism shown by the rhinoceros and the tickbird benefits both. Riding on the rhino's back, the tickbird eats its fill of the ticks that bother the rhino while the rhino gets warning calls from the bird when it senses danger. In commensalism, one member benefits and the other is unaffected. Certain barnacles attach themselves to whales, gaining a safe home and transportation to food-rich waters. But the whales are generally unaffected by the barnacles' presence. In parasitism, though, one species generally gets hurt, as when fleas infest a dog's coat and feed on its blood.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

symbiosis

a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to none of them. — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Organisms
the living together of two dissimilar organisms; the relationship may be beneficial to both (mutualism and symbiosis), beneficial to one without effect on the other (commensalism), beneficial to one and detrimental to the other (parasitism), detrimental to the first without any effect on the other (amensalism), or detrimental to both (synnecrosis). — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

symbiosis

The living together of two organisms from different species for mutual benefit.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbiosis - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] Nsimbiosis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs] n
(between organisms)symbiose f
(between people, organizations, systems)symbiose f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

symbiosis

nSymbiose f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] nsimbiosi f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sym·bi·o·sis

n. simbiosis, unión estrecha de dos organismos que pertenecen a especies diferentes.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

symbiosis

n (psych, etc.) simbiosis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last but not least, Krekic reports on that remarkable Latino-Slavic symbiosis, so characteristic of life in Dubrovnik and the Dalmation coast, especially during the late medieval period and the Renaissance.
Khan also argued that the case represented "a pure symbiosis between government and religion." She noted that Broaddus, who is Regent's counsel, had been named by the Virginia College Building Authority to represent the Authority in the case.
To understand this complex symbiosis, Professor Thomas found it necessary to attend not only performances of the NBT, but to attend services of a Pentecostal church, and to read widely in Nigerian Gelede ritualistic performances, all of which form the basis for Teer's performance theory and practice.
The book details the symbiosis of church-state relations in a remarkably broad scope of religious orientations across a daunting range of national contexts, including Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, the former East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the former Yugoslavia.
It is this "symbiosis" of old and new immigrants constantly recreating the city's social, cultural, and economic life, argues Berrol, that is responsible for New York's significance.
In sections on media involvement in events such as the first Zeppelin fly-over or air and car races, Fritzsche engagingly demonstrates the symbiosis of news and commercialization, event and representation, lived experience and media orchestration.
Don't miss Ross Ainslie and Ali Hutton's Symbiosis at Paisley Arts Centre.
[USA], Feb 28 (ANI): It turns out that the symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species.
Following on from the success of their debut album Symbiosis, Ross Ainslie and Ali Hutton released their second album Symbiosis II in 2018 to huge critical acclaim.
Although most of the horizontal transmission has ended in transient symbioses, a newly formed symbiosis between the symbiotic Chlorococcum sp.
M2 EQUITYBITES-September 26, 2018-US Food and Drug Administration grants approval to Sterile manufacturing CDMO Symbiosis Pharmaceutical Services for viral vector manufacturing fill/finish process