symphony


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sym·pho·ny

 (sĭm′fə-nē)
n. pl. sym·pho·nies
1. Music
a. An extended piece in three or more movements for symphony orchestra.
b. An instrumental passage in a vocal or choral composition.
c. An instrumental overture or interlude, as in early opera.
2. Music
a. A symphony orchestra.
b. An orchestral concert.
3. Harmony, especially of sound or color.
4. Something characterized by a harmonious combination of elements.

[Middle English symphonye, harmony, from Old French symphonie, from Latin symphōnia, from Greek sumphōniā, from sumphōnos, harmonious : sun-, syn- + phōnē, sound; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

symphony

(ˈsɪmfənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Classical Music) an extended large-scale orchestral composition, usually with several movements, at least one of which is in sonata form. The classical form of the symphony was fixed by Haydn and Mozart, but the innovations of subsequent composers have freed it entirely from classical constraints. It continues to be a vehicle for serious, large-scale orchestral music
2. (Classical Music) a piece of instrumental music in up to three very short movements, used as an overture to or interlude in a baroque opera
3. (Classical Music) any purely orchestral movement in a vocal work, such as a cantata or oratorio
4. (Classical Music) short for symphony orchestra
5. (Classical Music) (in musical theory, esp of classical Greece)
a. another word for consonance3 Compare diaphony2
b. the interval of unison
6. anything distinguished by a harmonious composition: the picture was a symphony of green.
7. archaic harmony in general; concord
[C13: from Old French symphonie, from Latin symphōnia concord, concert, from Greek sumphōnia, from syn- + phōnē sound]
symphonic adj
symˈphonically adv

sym•pho•ny

(ˈsɪm fə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1.
a. an extended sonatalike musical composition for large orchestra.
3. a concert performed by a symphony orchestra.
4. anything characterized by a harmonious combination of elements, esp. an effective combination of colors.
5. harmony of sounds.
6. Archaic. agreement; concord.
[1250–1300; Middle English symfonye < Old French symphonie < Latin symphōnia concert < Greek symphōnía harmony. See sym-, -phony]

Symphony

 a collection of sounds; a chorus; a collection of musical sounds or attractive colours, 1874.
Examples: symphony of colour, 1874; of commendations, 1654; of laughter, 1713; of the ocean, 1849.

symphony

An extended orchestral work, usually in four movements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symphony - a long and complex sonata for symphony orchestrasymphony - a long and complex sonata for symphony orchestra
sonata - a musical composition of 3 or 4 movements of contrasting forms
2.symphony - a large orchestrasymphony - a large orchestra; can perform symphonies; "we heard the Vienna symphony"
orchestra - a musical organization consisting of a group of instrumentalists including string players

symphony

noun
Pleasing agreement, as of musical sounds:
Music: consonance.
Translations
symfonie
symfoni
sinfonia
simfonija
szimfónia
sinfónía
交響曲
교향곡
simfonijasimfoninis
simfonijasimfōnija
symfónia
simfonija
symfoni
เพลงสำหรับวงดนตรีประสานเสียงขนาดใหญ่
nhạc giao hưởng

symphony

[ˈsɪmfənɪ]
A. Nsinfonía f
B. CPD symphony orchestra Norquesta f sinfónica

symphony

[ˈsɪmfəni] nsymphonie fsymphony orchestra norchestre m symphonique

symphony

nSinfonie f, → Symphonie f; a symphony of colours (liter)eine Sinfonie von Farben, eine Farbensinfonie

symphony

[ˈsɪmfənɪ] nsinfonia

symphony

(ˈsimfəni) plural ˈsymphonies noun
a usually long piece of music for an orchestra of many different instruments, in three or four movements or parts.
symˈphonic (-ˈfo-) adjective

symphony

سِيمْفُونِيَّة symfonie symfoni Sinfonie συμφωνία sinfonía sinfonia symphonie simfonija sinfonia 交響曲 교향곡 symfonie symfoni symfonia sinfonia симфония symfoni เพลงสำหรับวงดนตรีประสานเสียงขนาดใหญ่ senfoni nhạc giao hưởng 交响乐
References in classic literature ?
It will be generally admitted that Beethoven's Fifth Symphony is the most sublime noise that has ever penetrated into the ear of man.
Monsieur Ratignolle stared a little, and turned to ask Mademoiselle Reisz if she considered the symphony concerts up to the standard which had been set the previous winter.
In this book it is rather the cheerful aspect of summer, those upland valleys of the Cevennes presenting then a symphony in red, so to call it--as in a land of cherries and goldfinches; and he has a genial power certainly of making you really feel the sun on the backs of the two boys out early for a long ramble, of old peasants resting themselves a little, with spare enjoyment, ere the end:--
One of us compared the harmony existing between a Haydn symphony and pistache ice cream to the exquisite congruity between Milly and Cypher's.
What was the overture to Guillaume Tell but a symphony under another name?
It was a distinct yet distant and dreamlike symphony of melodious instruments, as if an airy band had been hidden on the hillside and made faint music at the summons.
I blessed my specialist, I blessed Squire Rattray, I blessed the very villains who had brought us within each other's ken; and nowhere was my thanksgiving more fervent than in the deep cleft threaded by the beck; for here the shrewd yet gentle wind passed completely overhead, and the silence was purged of oppression by the ceaseless symphony of clear water running over clean stones.
Casaubon, or rather from the symphony of hopeful dreams, admiring trust, and passionate self devotion which that learned gentleman had set playing in her soul.
Yes, you darling old Goth, a symphony by the great Beethoven
He gives us often the blaring music of a military band or the loud, swelling volume of an organ, but very seldom the softer tones of a violin or symphony.
Broad mirth, in the sacred presence of dark misfortune, would have jarred harshly and irreverently with the solemn symphony that rolled its undertone through Hepzibah's and her brother's life.
Colonel Killigrew all this time had been trolling forth a jolly bottle song, and ringing his glass in symphony with the chorus, while his eyes wandered toward the buxom figure of the Widow Wycherly.