synagogue

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syn·a·gogue

also syn·a·gog  (sĭn′ə-gŏg′, -gôg′)
n.
1. A building or place of meeting for worship and religious instruction in the Jewish faith.
2. A congregation of Jews for the purpose of worship or religious study.
3. The Jewish religion as organized or typified in local congregations.

[Middle English, from Old French sinagoge, from Late Latin synagōga, from Greek sunagōgē, assembly, synagogue, from sunagein, to bring together : sun-, syn- + agein, to lead; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

syn′a·gog′i·cal (-gŏj′ĭ-kəl), syn′a·gog′al (-gŏg′əl, -gôg′-) adj.

synagogue

(ˈsɪnəˌɡɒɡ)
n
1. (Judaism)
a. a building for Jewish religious services and usually also for religious instruction
b. (as modifier): synagogue services.
2. (Judaism) a congregation of Jews who assemble for worship or religious study
3. (Judaism) the religion of Judaism as organized in such congregations
[C12: from Old French sinagogue, from Late Latin synagōga, from Greek sunagōgē a gathering, from sunagein to bring together, from syn- + agein to lead]
synagogical, synagogal adj

syn•a•gogue

or syn•a•gog

(ˈsɪn əˌgɒg, -ˌgɔg)

n.
1. a Jewish house of worship, often having facilities for religious instruction or serving as a community center.
2. a congregation of Jews for the purpose of religious worship.
3. Rare. the Jewish religion; Judaism.
[1125–75; < Late Latin synagōga < Greek synagōgḗ assembly, meeting =syn- syn- + agōgḗ, n. use of feminine of agōgós (adj.) gathering; see -agogue]
syn`a•gog′i•cal (-ˈgɒdʒ ɪ kəl) syn′a•gog`al (-ˌgɒg əl, -ˌgɔ gəl) adj.

Synagogue

 an assembly; a congregation of Jews, 1175; of Rome, 1674; of Satan, 1565.

synagogue

A Jewish place of worship.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synagogue - (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregationsynagogue - (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation
house of God, house of prayer, house of worship, place of worship - any building where congregations gather for prayer
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
Translations
كَنيس، مَكان الصّلاه عِند اليَهودمَعْبَدُ اليَهُود
synagogasynagóga
synagoge
synagogajuutalainenseurakunta
sinagoga
zsinagóga
samkunduhús, sÿnagóga
シナゴーグ
유태교 예배당
sinagoga
sinagoga
synagóga
sinagoga
synagoga
โบสถ์ของศาสนายิว
giáo đường Do thái

synagogue

[ˈsɪnəgɒg] Nsinagoga f

synagogue

[ˈsɪnəgɒg] nsynagogue f

synagogue

nSynagoge f

synagogue

[ˈsɪnəˌgɒg] nsinagoga

synagogue

(ˈsinəgog) noun
(the building used by) a gathering of Jews meeting together for worship.

synagogue

مَعْبَدُ اليَهُود synagoga synagoge Synagoge συναγωγή sinagoga synagoga synagogue sinagoga sinagoga シナゴーグ 유태교 예배당 synagoog synagoge synagoga sinagoga синагога synagoga โบสถ์ของศาสนายิว sinagog giáo đường Do thái 犹太教堂
References in periodicals archive ?
They created their works during an assimilationist period, and obviously kept off the tracks of synagogal musical tradition to suit the theories of the then-active reformed rabbis and laymen.
More importantly for the topic of this essay, he published a collection of Sephardic synagogal melodies interspersed with original compositions (Consolo, 1891; Spagnolo, 2009).
Nearby on Zydu gatir: the Great Synagogue of Mlnius, the Synagogal courtyard, and the Strashun Library, which once housed one of the largest collections of Judaica in Europe.
There is, in any case, no getting around the firm association between synagogal sound and aural chaos in the Gentile mind.
Duly noted is the change in synagogal worship with the destruction of the temple, as by the second century synagogal services were now "approaching a liturgy of worship" (132).
A sampling of topics: cultivating visions through exegetical meditations, earthly and heavenly Jerusalem in Philo and Paul, the study of magic in rabbinic literature, mystical motifs in a Greek synagogal prayer, Eve's vision of the chariot in the Greek life of Adam and Eve, the dynamics of early Christian mysticism, and multiple divine beings in late antique Jewish theology.
The texts designated reading divisions according to synagogal parashiyot.
The Orthodox Union and the Rabbinical Council of America, respectively the national synagogal and rabbinical organizations of Orthodox Judaism, cosponsor an ongoing Catholic-Jewish dialogue, with the bishops' Committee on Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs as the official Catholic partner.
27) While the "synagogue" is mentioned in texts about Galilee from Jesus' period, archeologists have uncovered almost no synagogal structures.
In this double CD and attached Czech-English booklet, the editor--the musicologist Veronika Seidlova--, presents the cantor Ladislav Blum (1911-1994) as a figure who linked the post-war period with the traditions of synagogal chant of the first half of the 20th century.
Rebecca was deeply pious and immersed herself not only as a worshipper but also in the many synagogal projects of Mikveh Israel.
Despite this openness, a wide majority of North American Jewry continues to reject the homey ineptitude of chavurot in favor of socially preferable synagogal conformity.