syncategorematic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

syncategorematic

(sɪnˌkætəˌɡɔːrəˈmætɪk)
adj
(Philosophy) philosophy applying to expressions that are not in any of Aristotle's categories, but form meaningful expressions together with them, such as conjunctions and adverbs

syncategorematic

a word that cannot be used as a term in its own right in logic, as an adverb or preposition. — syncategorematic, adj.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.syncategorematic - of a term that cannot stand as the subject or (especially) the predicate of a proposition but must be used in conjunction with other terms; "`or' is a syncategorematic term"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
categorematic - of a term or phrase capable of standing as the subject or (especially) the predicate of a proposition
References in periodicals archive ?
say[ing] that there are infinitely many objects of a certain kind ('infinitely' being taken in the syncategorematic sense) simply means that given any finite number of these objects there will be some larger number of them.
Yrjonsuuri reads Ockham's theory of connotative terms in the light of his account of syncategorematic language and hence understands his mental language as a universal grammar (akin to Chomsky's), which (unlike Chomsky's) is acquired (non-innate) and represents a mind-independently structured word.
When syncategorematic words are brought into play it becomes natural to take the propositio rather than the component words as the basic unit of meaning.
Written sometime after 1396, the tract is a specimen of the art of sophistria, or sophistic arguments, and it covers the following main topics: sophistria as a science, signification, syncategorematic terms, supposition, ampliation, restriction, complex signifiables, the significate of a proposition, mediate and immediate terms, propositions with a comparative or superlative term, and exceptive, exclusive and reduplicative propositions.
This is so because the phrase v UZASNYX MUCENIJAX must semantically bear on the SemA X of 'die', whose expression must be the syntactic subject of the clause: v UZASNYX MUCENIJAX is syncategorematic.
This is a source of error for many" and "such a production of abstract nouns from adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, verbs, and syncategorematic terms creates many difficulties and leads many into errors.
Politics" indirectly resembles what in the medieval scholastic tradition was called a syncategorematic term.
If it does not, then its role is completely syncategorematic, that is, it is then a contextually defined "incomplete symbol" having no content itself yet affecting the content of the larger expressions of which it is a part (the supplemented word and the supplemented sentence in which it occurs)--like a right parenthesis or a crucially placed comma.
Primitive (absolute) terms are acquired first in experience and semantically complex (connotative) terms are formed by combining primitive categorematic terms with syncategorematic terms according to the same recursive procedures which explain how mental sentences or thoughts are constructed.
You now operates as a sort of syncategorematic term or discourse particle, whose chief function is to establish cohesion amongst the various narrative units uttered, lived, and interpreted in closed-circuit diegesis by the fictional protagonist herself.
and') form, each of which demands syncategorematic terms, or equivalent surface expressions of this relation" (Vernon 2007, 96).
7) Or at least they should involve an "unsaturated" syncategorematic concept with at least two "arguments," as for example the concept to which the preposition "of" is subordinated in the construction "a donkey of a man.