synchoresis

synchoresis

(ˌsɪŋkəˈriːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the act or an instance of conceding an argument in order to make a stronger one
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

synchoresis

the making of a concession that will leave one’s opponent open to a sharp retort. — synchoretic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second edition, to mention just a few, epizeuxis, diacope, articulus, hypozeuxis, aporia, synchoresis, apostrophe, pathopeia, and congeries are all distinguished from their 1577 definitions by their ability to represent vehement passions.
Yet the contemporary Greek word for forgiveness is synchoresis. The word literally means "fitting together" (syn-chore-sis), "sharing the same space" or "making space for all people".
Yet the contemporary Greek word for forgiveness is synchoresis. The word literally means "fitting together" (syn-choresis), "Sharing the same space" or "making space for all people".