syncope


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syn·co·pe

 (sĭng′kə-pē, sĭn′-)
n.
1. Grammar The shortening of a word by omission of a sound, letter, or syllable from the middle of the word; for example, bos'n for boatswain.
2. Medicine A brief loss of consciousness caused by inadequate blood flow to the brain.

[Middle English sincopis, from sincopene, from Late Latin syncopēn, accusative of syncopē, from Greek sunkopē, from sunkoptein, to cut short : sun-, syn- + koptein, to strike.]

syn′co·pal (sĭng′kə-pəl, sĭn′-), syn·cop′ic (sĭn-kŏp′ĭk) adj.

syncope

(ˈsɪŋkəpɪ)
n
1. (Pathology) pathol a technical word for a faint
2. (Linguistics) the omission of one or more sounds or letters from the middle of a word
[C16: from Late Latin syncopa, from Greek sunkopē a cutting off, from syn- + koptein to cut]
syncopic, ˈsyncopal adj

syn•co•pe

(ˈsɪŋ kəˌpi, ˈsɪn-)

n.
1. the shortening of a word by omitting one or more sounds from the middle, as in the reduction of never to ne'er.
2. brief loss of consciousness associated with an inadequate flow of oxygenated blood to the brain.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin syncopē < Greek synkopḗ cutting up =syn- syn- + kopḗ act of cutting, <kóptein to cut]
syn•cop•ic (sɪnˈkɒp ɪk) syn′co•pal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.syncope - a spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brainsyncope - a spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brain
loss of consciousness - the occurrence of a loss of the ability to perceive and respond
2.syncope - (phonology) the loss of sounds from within a word (as in `fo'c'sle' for `forecastle')
phonemics, phonology - the study of the sound system of a given language and the analysis and classification of its phonemes
articulation - the aspect of pronunciation that involves bringing articulatory organs together so as to shape the sounds of speech

syncope

noun
Pathology. A temporary loss of consciousness:
Translations
mdlobasynkopa

syncope

[ˈsɪŋkəpɪ] N
1. (Med) → síncope m
2. (Ling, Mus) → síncopa f

syncope

n (Ling, Med) → Synkope f

syn·co·pe

n. síncope, desmayo o pérdida temporal del conocimiento;
anginal ______ anginoso;
deglutition ______ de deglución;
cardiac ______ cardíaco;
convulsive ______ convulsivo;
hysterical ______ histérico;
laryngeal ______ laríngeo.

syncope

n síncope m
References in classic literature ?
"Oh, do not place any reliance on that, madame; one drop of that elixir sufficed to recall life to a dying child, but three drops would have impelled the blood into his lungs in such a way as to have produced most violent palpitations; six would have suspended his respiration, and caused syncope more serious than that in which he was; ten would have destroyed him.
The light that long ago had struck me into syncope, recalled in this vision, seemed glidingly to mount the wall, and tremblingly to pause in the centre of the obscured ceiling.
Historical criteria that distinguish syncope from seizures.
Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of brain magnetic resonance imaging in excluding neurological causes in patients with syncope.
Chhorn Norin, administrative director of the provincial NSSF, on Thursday confirmed the worker died from a 'syncope issue'.
Detection of arrhythmias in the ECG record in the absence of change in EEG during episodes of these conditions such as cardiogenic syncope can alter the diagnosis and treatment of the patient.
Syncope is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED), accounting for 1%-3% of all hospital admissions.
Syncope is defined as a sudden and transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoxemia and hypoperfusion.
The current standard for diagnosing syncope is a positive tilt-table test performed according to one of the currently acceptable methods [1-5].
Vasovagal syncope is defined as syncope that usually occurs with upright posture held for more than 30 seconds, features diaphoresis, warmth, nausea, and pallor, and is associated with hypotension and relative bradycardia [1].
"I'd like you to pay attention to the fact that the [guideline states] that a 12-lead ECG should be performed in all pediatric patients presenting with syncope," which is defined as transient loss of consciousness.