syncrisis

syncrisis

a rhetorical device that emphasizes the comparison of opposites; contrast.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
References in periodicals archive ?
Contemporary rhetoricians have identified fourteen widespread progymnasmata: Fable, a fictional elaboration on a moral statement; Narrative, an account of an action; Chreia, commentary on a saying by a famous author; Maxim, commentary on an anonymous adage; Refutation of a narrative; Confirmation of a narrative; Commonplace, a sketch of a criminal character type; Encomion, a speech of praise; Invective, a speech of denunciation; Syncrisis, a comparison; Ethopoeia, an imitation of a fictional character's speech; Ecphrasis, a vivid description of a place; Thesis, an argument about a philosophical claim; and Law, an argument about hypothetical legislation.
The resulting syncrisis, Powers proposes, uses humor as a critical tool for dismantling social stereotypes of Latinos, as the production participates in a broader adjustment of political empowerment, such as the election of Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa as well as the first Latina U.
To divide what is unified, to unify what is divided: this is the very life of nature, the eternal systole and diastole, syncrisis and diacrisis, the inspiration and expiration of the world, in which we live, we move, wee are.
He left the Erotemata("Questions"), a Greek grammar based on the question-and-answer (Socratic) method; some letters; the Syncrisis, a comparison of old and new Rome; and a Latin translation of Plato's Republic.
Cleon concludes his syncrisis of the two cities by calling on public speakers to resist the temptations of intellectualism and instead to adopt the attitude of ordinary souls: just as they allow their decisions to conform to the wisdom of the laws so their leaders should not challenge the wisdom of their decisions.
While the play's corporeality creates a distinctly cholo surrogates (5) of one of the central myths related to Western democracy, the performance's syncrisis of culture also raises provocative questions about issues of identity in contemporary America.
At the same time, the assignment requires students to consider some idiosyncratic features of Edwards's style: his use of metaphors, antithesis, certain types of rhetorical questions, redundancy, syncrisis, enargia.