synecdoche


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syn·ec·do·che

 (sĭ-nĕk′də-kē)
n.
A figure of speech in which the name of a part is used to stand for the whole (as hand for sailor), the whole for a part (as the law for police officer), the specific for the general (as cutthroat for assassin), the general for the specific (as thief for pickpocket), or the material for the thing made from it (as steel for sword).

[Middle English synodoches, from Medieval Latin synodoche, alteration of Latin synecdochē, from Greek sunekdokhē, from sunekdekhesthai, to take on a share of : sun-, syn- + ekdekhesthai, to understand (ek-, out of; see eghs in Indo-European roots + dekhesthai, to take; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

syn′ec·doch′ic (sĭn′ĕk-dŏk′ĭk), syn′ec·doch′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

synecdoche

(sɪnˈɛkdəkɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a figure of speech in which a part is substituted for a whole or a whole for a part, as in 50 head of cattle for 50 cows, or the army for a soldier
[C14: via Latin from Greek sunekdokhē, from syn- + ekdokhē interpretation, from dekhesthai to accept]
synecdochic, ˌsynecˈdochical adj
ˌsynecˈdochically adv

syn•ec•do•che

(sɪˈnɛk də ki)

n.
a figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole or the whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in ten sail for ten ships or a Croesus for a rich man.
[1350–1400; < Latin synecdochē < Greek, =syn- syn- + ekdochḗ, v. derivative of ekdéchesthai to receive, understand = ek- ec- + déchesthai to receive]
syn•ec•doch•ic (ˌsɪn ɪkˈdɒk ɪk) syn`ec•doch′i•cal, adj.
syn`ec•doch′i•cal•ly, adv.

synecdoche

the use of a part for a whole or a whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in “a Rockefeller” for a rich man or “wheels” for transportation. — synecdochic, synecdochical, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

synecdoche

1. An expression in which part of something is used to stand for the whole (as in “a sail” to mean “a ship”), or the whole is used to mean a part (as in “The navy arrived.” to mean A sailor arrived.”).
2. A figure of speech where use of a part stands for the whole.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synecdoche - substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
fireside, hearth - home symbolized as a part of the fireplace; "driven from hearth and home"; "fighting in defense of their firesides"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
face - a part of a person that is used to refer to a person; "he looked out at a roomful of faces"; "when he returned to work he met many new faces"
Translations
synekdocha
Synekdoche

synecdoche

[sɪˈnekdəkɪ] Nsinécdoque f

synecdoche

nSynekdoche f
References in periodicals archive ?
The image of the hand is particularly suited to the contradictions of such a task, playing as it does on two diametrically opposed registers of the phenomenon of identification: According to a long-standing convention of propagandistic art, the hand evokes collective participation as a synecdoche for the human; and yet it simultaneously exceeds any such assimilation, looming here as singular and as fascinating as a fingerprint.
Taylor-Wood's native art world is the YBA scene of contemporary London, for which it is tempting to view Third Party as a synecdoche. If this is true, art making there would seem to involve an amphetamine social life and a shallow camaraderie complicated by bitter but suppressed competition.
The hand, that synecdoche for the old-fashioned artisanal approach to painting and sculpture, remains important to Koons, even though it isn't necessarily his hand doing the work of execution.
While acknowledging the importance of fashion for a postfeminist analysis of masquerade, Reiss refuses to allow "fashion" to become a synecdoche for Woman, as it so often is.
I've discussed this transformation in these pages before and won't repeat myself, except to suggest that what I've called a "pictorial turn" is taking place in the human sciences, a movement that promises to supplant the "linguistic turn" that Richard Rorty has identified as the fundamental issue in modern philosophy.(2) The picture, understood as a synecdoche for the entire circuit of production and consumption in visually dominated multimedia, is now emerging as the central topic of discussion in the study of culture, and in something like the way language did: that is, both as a kind of model or figure for other things (economics, politics, social theory) and as an unresolved problem.
Much current art prefers to forget that without the leap across difference that metaphor affords, the act of exhibiting containers of body fluids, for example, adds little to the so-called discourse on the body: synecdoche has but minor cognitive power.
If you're like me, you sat in awe and puzzlement as you watched the Charlie Kaufman-directed film starring Philip Seymour Hoffman titled "Synecdoche, New York."
Hussein selects eleven rhetorical figures from al-Zamakhshari, ranging from metonymy (kinaya) to redirection (iltifat) via paranomasia (tajnis) and ploke ([pi][lambda]ok[??], radd al-'ajuz 'ald l-sadr), and then builds his own critical toolbox with the help of Francois Moreau from late twentieth-century France: metonymy, simile, metaphor, analogy, and the loose trope (synecdoche).
In fact, the whole experience is a sort of synecdoche - the programmer represents every one of us in that he thinks he is a free man but instead, he has a controller.
In the English-language world, two films seem to have grown in reputation in the decade since: the scabrously funny In Bruges and the complex, morbid, almost Borgesian folly Synecdoche, New York, with the late Philip Seymour Hoffman as a theatre director blurring the line between art and reality.
Another major role came in 2008, in the bizarre post-modern drama film "Synecdoche, New York", where he played a theatre director who watches his life fall apart while he sets out to create the grandest play of his career.
As a synecdoche for the party's inability to gain political or cultural traction, the song "William Weld in the 21st Century" has seemingly nothing to do with Weld's role as a third-party candidate.