ganglion

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Related to synovial cyst: Ganglion cyst

gan·gli·on

 (găng′glē-ən)
n. pl. gan·gli·a (-glē-ə) or gan·gli·ons
1. A group of nerve cells forming a nerve center, especially one located outside the brain or spinal cord.
2. Medicine A benign cystic lesion resembling a tumor, occurring in a tendon sheath or joint capsule.
3. A center of power, activity, or energy.

[From Greek, cystlike tumor, nerve bundle.]

gan′gli·on′ic (-ŏn′ĭk) adj.

ganglion

(ˈɡæŋɡlɪən)
n, pl -glia (-ɡlɪə) or -glions
1. (Anatomy) an encapsulated collection of nerve-cell bodies, usually located outside the brain and spinal cord
2. any concentration of energy, activity, or strength
3. (Pathology) a cystic tumour on a tendon sheath or joint capsule
[C17: from Late Latin: swelling, from Greek: cystic tumour]
ˈganglial, ˈgangliar adj
ˌgangliˈonic, ˈganglionˌated, ˈgangliˌate, ˈgangliˌated adj

gan•gli•on

(ˈgæŋ gli ən)

n., pl. -gli•a (-gli ə)
-gli•ons.
1. a concentrated mass of interconnected nerve cells.
2. a cystic tumor formed on the sheath of a tendon.
3. a center of intellectual or industrial force, activity, etc.
[1675–85; < Late Latin: a type of swelling < Greek gánglion a tumor under the skin, on or near a tendon]
gan′gli•al, gan′gli•ar, adj.
gan`gli•on′ic (-ˈɒn ɪk) adj.

gan·gli·on

(găng′glē-ən)
Plural ganglia
A compact group of nerve cells having a specific function. In invertebrate animals, pairs of ganglia occur at intervals along the axis of the body, with the forwardmost pair functioning like a brain. In vertebrates, ganglia are usually located outside the brain or spinal cord and control the functioning of the body's internal organs.

ganglion

A mass of nerve cell bodies outside the central nervous system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ganglion - an encapsulated neural structure consisting of a collection of cell bodies or neuronsganglion - an encapsulated neural structure consisting of a collection of cell bodies or neurons
autonomic ganglion - any of the ganglia of the autonomic system whose unmyelinated fibers innervate the internal organs
nervous system, systema nervosum - the sensory and control apparatus consisting of a network of nerve cells
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
basal ganglion - any of several masses of subcortical grey matter at the base of each cerebral hemisphere that seem to be involved in the regulation of voluntary movement
Translations
gangliohermokeskushermosolmu

ganglion

[ˈgæŋglɪən] N (ganglia, ganglions (pl)) [ˈgæŋglɪə]ganglio m

ganglion

n pl <ganglia>
(Anat) → Ganglion nt; (Med) → Überbein nt, → Ganglion nt
(fig, of activity) → Zentrum nt

ganglion

[ˈgæŋglɪən] nganglio

gan·gli·on

n. ganglio.
1. masa de tejido nervioso en forma de nudo;
2. quiste en un tendón o en una aponeurosis, que se observa a veces en la muñeca, en el talón o en la rodilla;
___ -a, basal___ -s basales;
___, carotid___ carotídeo;
___, celiac___ celíaco.

ganglion

n (pl -glia) (neuro) ganglio; — cyst ganglión m
References in periodicals archive ?
The differential diagnosis of intra-articular tumorous lesions of the knee is broad; in addition to synovial hemangioma, it includes pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), nodular synovitis, lipoma arborescens, juxtaarticular myxoma, plexiform neuroma, synovial osteochondromatosis, ganglion, synovial cyst, synovial sarcoma, leiomyoma, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, and schwannoma.
Differential diagnoses: facet joint synovial cyst, intraspinal neoplasms
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps in differentiating the giant cell tumor of tendon sheath from other soft tissue lesions such as lipoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, synovial cyst, and ganglion, all of which constitute the differential diagnosis of the former.
Other features are bone erosions, synovial cyst, degenerative changes, and chondromatosis.
However, the differential diagnosis included other space-occupying lesions such as a sequestrated lumbar disc, complicated synovial cyst, hematoma, and malignant lymphoma.
4) detected a lumbar intraspinal synovial cyst on MR and CT images obtained from a patient with low back pain and left sciatica.
With a preliminary diagnosis of a synovial cyst or perhaps an old degenerative free sequestrated disc, surgery was offered and the patient agreed immediately.
The most common associated pathology is joint effusion, followed by degenerative changes, meniscal tear, synovial cyst, bone erosion, and synovial chondromatosis (2, 4).
At a private hospital in Birmingham, I met my specialist Spencer Harland, a consultant spinal neurosurgeon, who showed me the results of the scan and said I had a lumbar synovial cyst on the left side of my lower back.
Our report is the first case in which PIN entrapment was cured conventionally, the patient recovered fully without surgical intervention, and full resolution of the synovial cyst was correlated with imaging methods and EMG in the long-term.