systematicness

systematicness

(ˌsɪstəˈmætɪknɪs)
n
the nature of being systematic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Some principles such as systematicness, objectivity, comparativeness, comprehensiveness, purpose, and operability need to be strictly followed [13].
With such characteristics as clear-cut result and strong systematicness, it can solve fuzzy and hard-to-quantify problems (Song Yongpeng., 2012; Zhou Yongzheng., 2010).
Meanwhile, FCE usually lacks systematicness and generality when it is used to solve different evaluation models [12].
The number of correlations is not the only parameter; systematicness of the correlations is also crucial for the ability of their detection.
In fact, it is a common challenge for the vascular surgeon when faces to peripheral artery occlusive disease because of its systematicness. The benefit from reconstruction surgery of the femoropopliteal segment in the same session was controversial.
One is that the research of enterprise behavior at different levels in value chain generally lacks of systematicness from the perspective of macroscopic.
(156) Thus, it is difficult to discuss, with any specificity, a hypothetical case of a crime against humanity against a civilian transgender or intersex population and analyze its systematicness. The most that can be said at this point is that criminal actions amounting to "random acts that were not committed as part of a broader plan or policy" would not qualify as systematic and would not be crimes against humanity.
Compared with econometric analysis, the CGE analysis has better systematicness and integrality.
Whereas totality denotes the observation of social life as systematic, and systematicness in its turn, the identification of a universal structure, the manifestations of which indeed constitute social life, the aspirations towards meaningfulness are primarily associated with the study of social life in oral tradition cultures (lacking written language) (cf.
Because the systematicness and nature of our data collection as well as our research questions have shifted over time, looking at our data over a number of cohorts allows us to raise additional questions of both content and methodology.
In order to facilitate the merging of the two, qualitative data analysis computer programs have been designed to articulate with statistical packages, implicitly promising the "best of both worlds." In this way, the rigour and "systematicness" of statistical analysis could now be applied to textual and field data in one keystroke, making qualitative research more positive, more scientific, more acceptable.