taarab


Also found in: Wikipedia.

taarab

A musical style popular among the Swahili-speaking peoples of East Africa that emerged from a fusion of Egyptian and Indian melodies with African rhythms.
References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalOn Friday, the band will move down to the traditional square of Lamu Town, where they will alternate with the Al Noor Sunny Taarab band, a popular local outfit.
In the Taarab category, Kimilili Girls Primary from Western emerged the best with 89 per cent followed by Kitale School at 88 per cent while Isbania Primary from Migori came third with 87 per cent.
Elite Seef Residence & Hotel holds a weekly 'Grill and Taarab Night' every Friday from 7pm to 11pm with live Arabic entertainment and live grills.
They mainly occur in celebratory contexts such as weddings, kitchen parties, taarab music, send offs and female dances where groups of women or people are involved.
Over the years, many other musicians have produced songs ranging from Zilizopendwa, rap, gospel, R & B to Taarab. Today, Bongo genre has a huge following in the entire East Africa and many parts of the world.
(15) In her work on taarab, a popular music genre in Tanzania, Askew aptly demonstrates how, despite attempts by political parties to co-opt the genre for propaganda purposes, audience members, especially women, continue to interpret songs according to their own 'politics of the personal' and use taarab performance as a way to reconfigure social relations.
On the night of 5 April 2014, the Taarab music star, Mohammed Juma Bhalo (pictured, right), passed away.
The lovers and fans of Taarab were there to savour a quality and original old tunes of the classic Maghreb music and the association of Arab and Andalusian music; a mixture of Arab, Berber and Spanish musical traditions.
Taarab music in Zanzibar in the twentieth century: a story of "old is gold" and flying spirits.
aboobaz 'male cousin' taboobaz 'female cousin' ageelim 'male orphan' tageelim 'female orphan' aarab 'Arab man' taarab 'Arab woman' ateef[i.sup.n] 'Hausa man' tateef[i.sup.n] 'Hausa woman' a?ik?[a.sup.n] 'male enemy' ta?ik?[a.sup.n] 'female enemy' This is found with only two nouns of non-Tuareg origin:
cerddoriaeth o'r enw taarab, gyda'i sigl urddasol, braf.
Among their topics are code-switching in the contemporary Kenyan novel after 2000, a feminist stylistic approach to the Swahili fiction of Ben Mtobwa, metaphor and the economy of hope in Jared Angira's Lament of the Silent & Other Poems (2004), changing faces of the extended metaphorical frame of Taarab lyrics, and opposing influences of tradition and modernity in Somali drama.