tabloidy

tabloidy

(ˈtæblɔɪdɪ)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) censorious characteristic of a tabloid newspaper; trashy
References in periodicals archive ?
Through two years of development, fresh reasons were found to dramatize the infamous case--"this tabloidy, National Enquirey thing," as co-creator Scott Alexander deems it--by emphasizing issues not generally part of the 1995 conversation: gender politics, public vs.
The reader can never quite shrug off the sense that the novel is a sort of laboratory experiment that hasn't entirely gelled, an experiment in which an author who writes with Jamesian attention to emotional nuance has tried to inject a tabloidy story line with literary import." MICHIKO KAKUTANI
While I have time for some of what is broadcast on Talksport's radio shows, the station does - to mix a media metaphor - tend to be a bit 'tabloidy'.
*Philly tabloid more tabloidy: The redesigned Philadelphia Daily News debuted last week, looking less staid than in the past and focusing on a populist outlook.
Andy says: "To be honest I was a bit scared in the beginning because I thought it was going to be a bit like tabloidy television, but it's not been like that at all.
"I'm not the kind of person who can just come out with a tabloidy sound bite, I'm much more measured.
It's all really ridiculous, the tabloidy stuff and the chatter that comes with it.
Designer Mario Garcia weighed in on his blog: "It is a bit tabloidy, indeed, but that is good in my way of thinking.
And in these tabloidy times, they are much better role models than Britney/Lindsay/Paris/Nicole.
Deputy Editor Narda Zacchino, who came to the paper in May 2001 after 31 years at the Los Angeles Times, says she's a little on the conservative side--"early on, they were sometimes a little tabloidy" she says of the front pages--but overall she likes them.
Phil Stanford's just-the-facts excursion into the bad old days in Portland is rich with tabloidy tidbits.