tabret


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tabret

(ˈtæbrɪt)
n
(Instruments) archaic a smaller version of a tabor
References in periodicals archive ?
Augustine described the singing at Alexandria under Athanasius and observed that "the piping organ, tabret, and harp are here associated so intimately with the sensual heathen cults, as well as with the wild revelries and shameless performances of the degenerate theatre and circus, that it is easy to understand the prejudices against their use in the worship." Nevertheless, Augustine defended the use of instruments in church, saying in his Confessions that "as the music flowed into my ears, the truth was poured into my heart." The gist of Augustine's scruple was the ultimate purpose of instrumental music in the liturgy.
Maurice Tabret is bed-ridden for life after a flying accident.
Take, for example, the majestic Margot Leicester as Mrs Tabret: "I will not weep because he is dead, I will rejoice because he is free."
With such a masterly cast your suspicions fall from head to head as each character takes their turn profess Theatre Review The story begins with war hero Maurice Tabret left paralysed from the waist down after a plane crash.
"And the Cause of all ther beinge ther was to see pappett players which was then and ther a handlinge" (Marchaunt), or merely "playinge" (Stone), together with minstrels, one of whom beat a tabret (a small drum).
Second, the celebrations for Twelfth Night in 1494 included a disguising Of 12 gentlemen and 12 ladies, `preceded by a 'small Tabret & a subtyle ffedyll"'.(39) The ladies danced very demurely, with no violent gestures or movements to disturb their limbs.
I was the People's Darling and Delight In former times; for when I came in sight, Thro' crowded Streets loud Acclamations rung, They to the Tabret my loud Praises sung; And on my Chariot Wheels transported hung.
ii.435 |the sound of tabret, harp, etc.': Isaiah 30:32.
First World War hero Maurice Tabret is disabled after a flying accident, tended lovingly by his mother, his beautiful wife Stella, and the devoted Nurse Wayland.
The play tells of World War I veteran Maurice Tabret who, in this version, has been left paralysed from the waist down in a plane crash.
It features First World War hero Maurice Tabret who is disabled after a flying accident and is being cared for by his mother, wife and nurse.
The end of life is the end of mirth and joy, a muting of the tabrets and harps which in Isaiah 24:8 no longer sound in a land desolated by its transgression of the covenant.